Training Evaluation

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CORPORATE LEADERSHIP COUNCIL

JANUARY 2003
www.corporateleadershipcouncil.com

Fact Brief

Level Three Training Evaluations
Key Questions
Profiled
Institution

Industry

Revenues

Insurance

A

Employees
20,000 – 50,000

More than $10 billion

5,000 – 20,000
50,000 – 100,000

More than $10 billion

D

Consumer Products

Less than 5,000

What is the content and design of level
three training evaluations?

More than $10 billion

C

Computer Software
and Services
Financial Services

For what types of training are level three
evaluations used?

Less than $1 billion

B

To whom, how, and when are level three
training evaluations administered?
What is done with collected data?

Issue Overview: Companies Want to Increase Use of Level Three Evaluations Table of Contents

Executive Summary

2

Determining Usage

3

Evaluation Content
And Delivery

7

Applying Results

12

Research Methodology

15

Appendix

According to a 2002 Learning and Development Roundtable study, 88 percent of surveyed companies cite measuring the “impact of specific training experiences on performance” (level three) as important. However, only 27 percent of surveyed 1

companies report actually utilizing this metric. According to the 2002 ASTD State of the Industry Report, approximately 12 percent of surveyed organizations evaluate for level 2
three.

16

It is no surprise that companies want to measure training programs for transfer of skills, or level three, given that creating better evaluation frameworks for training helps demonstrate the link between training and performance improvements, which in turn helps 3

build support for training programs.
It is also no surprise that training programs are not used as often as is desirable, given today’s fast-paced work environment, limited resources, and the difficulty of measuring 4,5
skills transfer, particularly for “soft” skills training. This report profiles companies’ practices in overcoming these obstacles to effectively implement level three evaluations. Once obstacles are overcome and level three is successfully implemented, companies can use the results to better identify reasons for training success or failure, improve its 6

training programs, and ultimately help realize business objectives.

Catalog No.:
CLC1WLANT
 2003 Corporate
Executive Board

This project was researched and written to fulfill the specific research request of a single member of the Corporate Leadership Council and as a result may not satisfy the information needs of other members. In its short-answer research, the Corporate Leadership Council refrains from endorsing or recommending a particular product, service or program in any respect. Sources are contacted at random within the parameters set by the requesting member, and the resulting sample is rarely of statistically significant size. That said, it is the goal of the Corporate Leadership Council to provide a balanced review of the study topic within the parameters of this project. The Corporate Leadership Council encourages members who have additional questions about this topic to assign short-answer research projects of their own design.

 2003 Corporate Executive Board

LEVEL THREE TRAINING EVALUATIONS
JANUARY 2003

PAGE 2

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Profiled companies do not use standard formulas to determine which programs will be assessed for level three, what evaluation instruments to use, or how to analyze and report collected data. Each step of the evaluation process, rather, is tailored to fit the unique objectives of the particular training program. Key findings of level three evaluation practices are summarized below:

Determining
Usage

Using Level
Three
Evaluations for
High-Priority
Programs
Communicating
Level Three
Usage to
Stakeholders
Determining the
Measurability of
Training
Programs




Profiled companies cite limited resources as an...
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