Time Management

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Study:
“Working to live: Why university students balance full-time study and employment" According to Valerie Holmes, within this group 83 per cent of students worked at some point during term-time of their degree programmed. In total 58 per cent of those students who worked did so to either cover or contribute to basic costs of living. While the majority of students felt they could balance work and study, half of all students questioned felt that working could have a negative impact on their degree classification. Valerie Holmes, (2008) "Working to live: Why university students balance full-time study and employment", Education + Training, Vol. 50 Iss: 4, pp.305 – 314

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=1728331 |

The work–study relationship: experiences of full‐time university students undertaking part‐time employment Journal of Education and Work
Volume 23, Issue 5, 2010
Ralph Halla*
Pages 439-449
Publishing models and article dates explained
Received: 21 Apr 2010
Accepted: 14 Jul 2010
Version of record first published: 29 Nov 2010

Abstract
Work and study commitments of full‐time undergraduate students at the University of New South Wales were investigated in four surveys conducted in 1994, 1999, 2006 and 2009. Respondents to the surveys reported the amount of time they spent during term time in paid employment, studying outside of formal class hours and in leisure activities (1999 and 2006 only). Fifty full‐time students in 2006 and 37 in 2009 who were identified through the survey as working in excess of 10 hours per week were interviewed about their work and study relationships. Findings are consistent with UK studies showing an increase in part‐time work by full‐time students. In addition, a steady decrease was found in hours of study outside normal class time and in time spent in leisure activities. Reasons for working offered by interviewees were predominantly financial although many reported that gaining work experience, even in areas not related to their studies, was an important consideration. While some of the students interviewed felt that the government should provide more support for full‐time students, the majority thought that the university should cater more for the needs of working students by providing more online facilities for assignment submission and communication and more flexible timetables and submission requirements. In the absence of any likely moves by governments to provide financial support to students, universities need to recognize the increasing demands placed on full‐time students by part‐time work and to implement procedures to assist working students. http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/cjew20

Literature:

More students balance school with jobs
By Jacob Serebrin | January 25th, 2012 |

More than half of full-time university students in Quebec work while attending school and more than 40 per cent of all undergraduates work more than 20 hours weekly says a new study by the Fédération étudiante universitaire du Québec, a provincial lobby group that wants lower tuition. On top of that, more than twice as many full-time students aged 20 to 24 in the province work part-time jobs than students did in the 1970s. The workloads are hurting their educations: 43 per cent of full-time undergraduates say that their jobs have negatively affected their studies and 30 per cent say their jobs mean they’ll take longer to finish. It’s worst for PhD students—six in 10 say work forced them to prolong their studies. It’s not just students in Quebec who are putting in long hours between classes. According to the 2011 Canadian University Survey Consortium study 56 per cent of undergraduates in Canada work. The average number of hours is 18 per week. Nearly a fifth (18 per cent) work more than 30 hours weekly. One third of working students report “a negative impact on their academic performance.” The latest research also builds on a November 2010 report put out by...
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