Tide Detergent

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Ariel is a marketing line of laundry detergents made by Procter & Gamble. It is the flagship brand in Procter & Gamble's European, Mexican, Japanese, Brazilian, Peruvian, Turkish, Filipino, Colombian, Chilean and Venezuelan portfolios. In some U.S. stores, Mexican Ariel is available. History

Ariel first appeared on the UK market in 1967 and was the first detergent with stain-removing enzymes. It was a high-sudsing powder designed for twin-tub and top-loading washing machines. With the rise in popularity of automatic front-loading washing machines, a suitable low-suds variant was launched in the early 1970s. The mid-eighties saw the range expanding to encompass liquid detergent and compact powder. The compact powder was originally known as "Ariel Ultra"; and was subsequently reformulated into the nineties as "Ariel Futur". This was possibly in response to Unilever's launch of the ultimately doomed "Persil Power", which was seen to damage clothes. Compact powders never proved popular in the UK; so when the tablet variant appeared in July 1999, the compact version disappeared. In 2003, Ariel brought out its quickwash action to its detergents, to allow consumers to be able to do their laundry on a quickwash cycle.

The available range in India currently includes:
Detergent powders
* Ariel Complete (For hand wash or top-loading washing machines [HWTL]) * Ariel Anti Bac (For HWTL)
* Ariel 24-hour Fresh (For HWTL)
* Ariel Matic (For top- and front-loading washing machines)

Ariel is available in powder, tablet, ExcelGel and liquitab form. * In 2006, Ariel started its "turn to 30" campaign to inspire consumers to wash in cool water so that energy can be saved. * Ariel launched a concentrated version of their liquid detergents named Ariel Power in the spring of 2008. * In October 2008, Ariel launched their new Excel Gel product which can be used in temperatures as low as 15 degrees celsius. This product was launched under Ariel's "cold is the new hot" campaign. * In 2010, Ariel brought out their Stain Remover product range, claiming to customers that it would get rid of their stains first time or their money back Controversial Ads

In 2010, Ariel released a series of controversial web banners [1] that appeared to compare former US President George W. Bush to Adolf Hitler, depicting both in caricature as "stains" that users could transform into more benign characters (Mohandas Gandhi and Charlie Chaplin, respectively), by spraying them with Ariel liquid. The online ads were created for Ariel by Brazilian Ad Agency Ponto de Criação. With Ariel, clothes became white and bright with much less effort. With further innovations like Ariel's activated bleach, and the introduction of an Ariel liquid detergent that helped protect colours and fabrics, they may have almost forgotten what a chore washing clothes could be! history

Your parents might also be able to tell you stories of building carts out of detergent drums and racing them in “soap-box derbies”. Ariel once again transformed the detergent world with material and packaging innovations that made the laundry process less harmful to the environment. In the 1980s, Ariel Ultra was among the first to reformulate without phosphates and with less ‘process aids’, allowing for more compact detergents. Your parents may also remember how Ariel’s dose sizes kept getting smaller and smaller in the 1980s, and especially the 90s. What they may not have realised, however, is that Ariel's compaction process helped lower the environmental impact by reducing packaging volume, transportation needs and wastewater treatment. Ariel also showed the way in packaging innovations by introducing refill packs, and dosing devices like the ‘Arielette’ and ‘RollerBall’, which helped Ariel’s cleaning power get straight to work, in the heart of the wash.

Today, you yourself can appreciate how Ariel is still transforming the washing process with convenient pre-measured...
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