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ABSTRACT Title of Thesis: FACTORS AFFECTING UNIVERSITY GPA OF MARYLAND COMMUNITY COLLEGE TRANSFER STUDENTS WHO PERSIST TO GRADUATION Sarah Elizabeth Hall, Master of Arts, 2005 Thesis Directed By: Dr. Linda Clement, Affiliate Associate Professor Department of Counseling and Personnel Services

This study examined Maryland community college transfer students who persist to graduation. Personal characteristics, academic qualifications, and major were examined to determine if any of these factors were predictors of university GPA. These characteristics were: age, race, gender, community college, transfer GPA, first semester GPA, accepted transfer credits, completion of freshmen fundamental studies, Associates degree completion, and college of major. The sample consisted of 530 subjects. The data analysis revealed significant results. Age, race, gender, transfer GPA, first semester GPA, and college of major were all significant predictors of variance in cumulative GPA for community college transfer students. Women, White subjects, and College of Education graduates were significantly more likely to earn higher cumulative GPAs than other subjects within each of these variables. University GPA was significantly correlated with age, transfer GPA, and first semester GPA. These findings have practical implications for admissions and student support services at four-year institutions.

FACTORS AFFECTING UNIVERSITY GPA OF MARYLAND COMMUNITY COLLEGE TRANSFER STUDENTS WHO PERSIST TO GRADUATION

By Sarah Elizabeth Hall

Thesis submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School of the University of Maryland, College Park, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts 2005

Advisory Committee: Dr. Linda Clement, Affiliate Associate Professor, Chair Dr. Vivian Boyd, Associate Professor Dr. Susan Komives, Associate Professor

© Copyright by Sarah Elizabeth Hall 2005

Acknowledgements
The completion of this work would not have been possible without the support of many people in my life. Thank you to my parents, who have always supported me in my academic endeavors. They have devoted all their time, money and energy to their three daughters, fostering our personal and intellectual growth. Thank you to John, my partner in life who has endured two years of a long distance relationship and offered me his love, support, and encouragement throughout this process. Thank you to my advisor and thesis chair, Dr. Linda Clement, for her willingness to always make time for me in order to meet deadlines and keep me on track. Her guidance, support, and advice have been instrumental in my success. She embodies a true student affairs professional who is dedicated to the growth of new professionals entering the field. Thank you to my classmates and co-workers at the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences Advising Center for their support and understanding of the demands of this Masters program. Finally, thank you to my thesis committee members, Dr. Vivian Boyd and Dr. Susan Komives, for their feedback and support throughout this process.

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Table of Contents
Acknowledgements....................................................................................................... ii Table of Contents......................................................................................................... iii List of Tables ................................................................................................................ v Chapter 1: Introduction ................................................................................................. 1 Introduction............................................................................................................... 1 Problem Statement .................................................................................................... 2 Background...
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