The Principles of Infection Prevention and Control (Ic 01)

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The principles of infection prevention and control
(IC 01)

Understand roles and responsibilities in the prevention and control of infections

The company I work for have a written policy that details the roles and responsibilities of all the staff during an outbreak of a communicable disease or infection. The plan includes details of the roles and responsibilities of all senior staff members.

The company I work for are responsible under health and safety legislation for maintaining an environment which is safe for clients, visitors and staff members. Suitable arrangements and procedures for the control of infection form part of the health and safety requirements.

The registered manager is responsible for ensuring all staff members receive training and education for the prevention and control of infection and how to monitor these. The registered manager is also responsible for ensuring an infection control audit is carried out and that any actions that have been recommended be put into practice.

The registered manager should also ensure that appropriate infection control policies and procedures, exist and are readily available and understood by all members of staff that work within the home.

Staff members are responsible for ensuring they wear the correct PPE at all times and have a good hand washing routine and attend regular infection training courses (Mulberry packs) to ensure their knowledge is up to date. All members of staff should be vigilant in their work environment and report any identified sources of infection to their shift leader.

Staff members are responsible for following Tracs Policies and Procedures at all times relating to infection control. These are listed below:

* Infection Control Policy
* Bloody, Bodily Fluids (Safe Handling) Policy
* Inoculation Injuries Policy
* Hepatitis B Policy

Related documents to these policies are:

* Hepatitis B disclaimer form.
* Induction Overwiew.
* Hand washing Poster.
* Infection Control Check list.
* Mop head and bucket cleaning schedule form.
* Cleaning schedule.
* DOH (England) infection control guidance for care homes.

Understand Legislation and Policies relating to prevention and control of infections.

RIDDOR – Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995 state that reportable illness and diseases include: Outbreaks of: diarrhoea, scabies, impetigo, measles, sickness. Certain poisonings.

some skin diseases such as occupational dermatitis, skin cancer, chrome ulcer, oil folliculitis (acne). Lung diseases including occupational asthma, farmer’s lung, pneumoconiosis, asbestosis, mesothelioma. Infections such as leptospirosis, hepatitis, tuberculosis, anthrax, legionellosis and tetanus. Other conditions such as occupational cancer, certain musculoskeletal disorders, decompression illness and hand-arm vibration syndrome.

COSHH Regulations 1999 – apply to all work with substances hazardous to health (including micro organisms). COSHH information should be available where chemicals are stored. The regulations provide a comprehensive policy for the employer to manage risk by preventing exposure to hazardous substances if reasonably practicable and where this is not possible exposure should be controlled adequately.

The methods of control vary but the use of PPE equipment such as gloves, aprons should be regarded as a good starting point.

COSHH’s main features are:
* Identify substances hazardous to health in the workplace. * Formally asses the risk to employees from these materials. This is done in writing. * Adequately control and monitor the risk.

* Provide health surveillance where appropriate.
* Provide adequate training and instructions.

Health and Safety Regulations 1996: The employer has a duty of care toward his employees, service users and others who visit or work at the Care Home to provide a safe place of work, to...
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