The Healing Hospital: Serving God and His People

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The Healing Hospital: Serving God and His Peopl
Grand Canyon University
Spirituality in Healthcare
HLT 310V
August 28, 2011

The Healing Hospital Paradigm
The Healing Hospital paradigm does not only bring love and care back to health care but radical loving care to the bedside. This concept, although seemingly progressive, borrows and puts into action theories of such great theorist as Jean Watson that believe in treating the mind, body, and soul (Watson, 2009). The average hospital mission statement is filled with promises of caring compassionate health care, but as with society today, they are mostly talk and no action. The Healing Hospital brings the talk into action bringing the radical care from the management down, believing that each person has a calling not a job that simply ends in provision. The spiritual aspect is brought back into health care for the patients as well as the staff, where each meeting is considered a sacred encounter. Although this sounds like a hospital made in heaven, it is a reality for such hospitals as Baptist Trust in Nashville, Tennessee and Mercy Gilbert Hospital in Gilbert, Arizona (Chapman, 2007). Mind, Body, and Soul

So what are the mind, body and soul? The mind is defined as the part that processes reason, thinks, feels, wills, perceives, and judges the processes of the human brain. It is the totality of the conscious and unconscious thought processes and activities (, 2011). The body is the physical being that can be seen with the naked eye. This brings us to the question of: what is a soul? According to the dictionary the soul is “the principle of life, feeling, thought, and action in humans, regarded as a distinct entity separate from the body and the mind; the spiritual part of humans as distinct from the physical part. Also believed to survive death and be subject to happiness or misery in the life after death: assuming the immortality of the soul [ (, 2011) ]. Jean Watson describes the human being as: “a valued person in and of him or herself to be cared for, respected, nurtured, understood and assisted; in general a philosophical view of a person as a fully functional integrated self. A human that is viewed as greater than and different from, the sum of his or her parts” [ (Watson, 2009) ]. Patient’s Perspective

From the patient’s perspective, the Healing Hospital incorporates the body, mind, and spirituality into healing. To heal is a verb that means to make healthy, whole, or sound; restore to health; free from ailment; to free from evil; cleanse purify; to heal the soul (, 2011). Spirituality is confused with religion. A person can be spiritual and not necessarily be associated with a religion, as well as a religious person may lack spirituality. Someone once said that spirituality is what’s left when religion is set aside. Patients and their families are treated with respect and are treated as a whole person with love and compassion, regardless of their religion or spiritual beliefs. Employee’s Perspective

The dream job for a health care provider is working in a hospital where the morale is high; there is a low turnover, job satisfaction, and a loving-caring environment from management as well as fellow employees. Employees should feel like a valued part of a team not just their last four digits of their social security number. Many hospitals today create an environment where the doctors are valued above others at everyone’s expense including the patients. Job satisfaction for a nurse is being able to give the care that they feel their patients deserve. The healing hospital offers all of the above as well as allows employees to treat the patients as a whole person without repercussion.

Hospital’s Perspective
Healing Hospitals look for employees who believe that their job is a calling. They look for those that have a servant’s heart. Employees that have a high fire and...
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