Teenage Pregnanacy

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 341
  • Published : January 29, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
This document presents an analysis of teenage pregnancy as social issue. How society looks at teenage pregnancy and impact on other categories. This document also represents facts about teenage pregnancy, impact to society and suggestion on how to improve the situation. This document discusses different methods for research and uses some example of methods to provide analysis of teenage pregnancy and effect to society.

Important for Sociological Consideration
As a social issue, teen pregnancies can be a direct result of contributing social problems: poverty, poor education, a history of physical and sexual abuse, poor self-esteem, and unemployment. Teens that perform at poor academic levels, or are born to mothers who were teen mothers themselves, are also at a higher risk for teen pregnancy. Young people's sexual behavior is largely determined by social influences and around the globe; these influences are strikingly similar (DeNoon, Daniel J, 2011). Social impact of their behavior makes teenage pregnancy an important social issue. There are multiple reasons which this issue is important and why it required attention. One change is biological as 100 years ago; the average age for women to become pregnant was 18 years old, mostly because of poor nutrition. Now that we're more educated and our diets have been altered so that we receive better nutrition, the average age that a woman can become pregnant is 12 - 13 years old (Zuckerman, Diana, 2009). As science provide statistic that woman can be pregnant at early age and there would be less complication for mother but mothers are not economically and mentally ready for this. Increase in teenage pregnancy and growing concern for parents and single mothers, dropout rates of students because of pregnancy raise flag for society and ask question to think about teenage pregnancy. Other concern came across when study found that Women exposed to abuse, violence and family strife in childhood are more likely than those without such experiences to have a teenage pregnancy (Tamkins, T, 2004) Teenage Pregnancy Social Issue

Teenage sexual activity and pregnancy is an issue of widespread national concern. Although teen sexual activity has declined in recent years, the overall rate is still high. About 16 million teenage girls become mothers every year. Teenage pregnancy is result of young people sexual behavior which is largely determined by social influence and culture they live in. Open culture like US and other western countries have more problem then controlled cultures. Society looks at this as an issue because there are severe effects physically and biologically on young mothers. There is also risk of Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) - acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) infection because of unsafe sex. Young people aged 15 to 24 get about half of the world's new HIV infections. We often blame them for being ignorant, for their notoriously bad judgment, for their impulsivity or we let them off the hook for lack of access to condoms and lack of sex education. (DeNoon, 2011) These effects remain for the teen mother and her child even after adjusting for those factors that increased the teenager’s risk for pregnancy; such as, growing up in poverty, having parents with low levels of education, growing up in a single-parent family, and having low attachment to and performance in school.

Below are few facts about teenage pregnancy:
1. In 2009, a total of 409,840 infants were born to 15−19 year olds, for a live birth rate of 39.1 per 1,000 women in this age group (Singh S, Darroch JE , 2010). 2. Nearly two-thirds of births to women younger than age 18 and more than half of those among 18−19 year olds are unintended (Singh S, Darroch JE , 2010). 3. Teen pregnancy accounts for more than $9 billion per year in costs to U.S. taxpayers for increased health care and foster care, increased incarceration rates among...
tracking img