Teen Pregnancy

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Running-head: Teen Pregnancy

Teen Pregnancy and Academic Success

Abstract
The prevention of academic failure and subsequent teen pregnancies is an important goal of our society. Parenthood is the leading cause of school dropout among teen girls. Competing demands of school and home can thrust adolescent mothers into stressful situations. These students may conclude that academic achievement is impossible. It is also the case that school achievement, attendance, and involvement helps reduce the risk of teen pregnancy (Casserly, Carpenter, and Halcon, 2001). Studies used have suggested that staying in school and getting an education helps improve the long-term well-being of teen mothers and prevent teen pregnancy.

Among the numerous social problems that can occur in adolescence, two problems- teen pregnancy and academic failure are major concerns as a result of their consequences. A lot of the times when teenagers become pregnant, many drop out of school. The issue is teen mothers are giving up on continuing their education because of the lack of opportunity and support. For this reason, school dropout rates are on the rise. There are many teenage girls with no support. No help from partner, family and friends, or school. According to the study of Perrin & Dorman (2001), ‘‘the hardest thing about being a teen mother is the isolation.’’ Moreover, they often do not achieve the qualifications they need to progress into further education, and in some cases, have difficulties finding childcare and other support they need to participate in education or employment. Consequently, teen mother’s struggle trying to obtain or balance an education while also in the process of providing care for a child. Finding ways to help improve the outcome of teen mothers today is of high importance. Teen mothers need support, it is essential to provide them with resources that will help them to succeed as a mother and as well as a student. Many teen parents have great aspirations for building a prosperous future, however, becoming a school-age mother in some cases limits a teens’ future success. Teenagers do believe that motherhood can seriously interfere with education or employment. School staff considers teen mothering to be a “bad choice” that eventually contributes to future hardships (SmithBattle, 2007). SmithBattle (2007) done a study on teen mothers’ to find out what the impact of mothering had on their educational goals and school progress. SmithBattle’s (2007) findings were that parenting teens were often unsuccessful on their education goals because of their family responsibilities, competing work demands, and limited school support. The different social worlds according to SmithBattle (2007) reflect the controversial views of educators and teen mothers. Whether teens give birth or not, the opportunities for teen mothers living in poverty are limited. Therefore, the quality of education and employment for the poorer teen moms are limited. A lot of teens who grow up in poor neighborhoods attend schools that are inferior compared to their middle-class peers. Schools that may seem inferior often do not offer as many advantages or foster a sense of competence that the other middle-class schools do. The lack of educational or vocational opportunities can thwart a teen’s success. On the other hand, according to SmithBattle’s (2007) professional and scientific views, “No one can dispute that teen mothers tend to be less educated and have lower incomes and are more likely to remain single than women who postpone parenting In fact, the majority of teen mothers gain a high school diploma and is eventually employed in stable positions. Also, teen mothers with the best outcomes held higher educational aspirations than teen mothers with poorer outcomes.” The studies of Smithfield (2007) have found that the prior disadvantages before giving birth is what contributes mostly to the negative outcomes of teen mothers in contrast to...
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