Annotated Bibliography

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Annotated Bibliography
Sex Education Programs
Allen, J. P., Philliber, S., Herrling, S., & Kupermine, G. P. (1997). Preventing teen pregnancy and academic failure: Experimental evaluation of a developmentally based approach. Child Development, 68, 729-742. Retrieved Februay 17, 2010, from UNM ILLiad library database. Teen pregnancy and school failure are among the top issues facing teens. This article is a result of data gathered from 1991 to 1995, evaluating teens who participated in a volunteer Teen Outreach Program vs. teen who did not. Teens who participated in the volunteer program, took an active interest in their future and were less likely to drop out of school or practice high risk sexual behavior. Resulting in the reducing of unplanned pregnancies and the spread of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among teenagers. The article provides details of the evaluation method and results with tables and statistics comparing the two groups. Supporting this article a credible source, the authors list more than 50 detailed resources to referencing their analysis. The authors of this article individually have a minimum of 15 years experience in human service delivery focusing on positive adolescent behavior and have various publications aiding in the research and sexual education and prevention of unplanned teenage pregnancies and school dropouts. The method and data resulting from this experiment will be used in the paper to support the importance of volunteer programs available to our youth (Allen, Philliber, Herrling, Kupermine, 1997). Bleakly, A., Hennessy, M., & Fishbein, M. (2006). Public opinion on sex education in U.S. schools. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med, 160, 1151-1156. Retrieved February 21, 2010, from http://archpedi.ama-assn.org/cgi/reprint/160/11/1151 According to the survey abstinence-only programs lack public support, regardless of religious or political background. Majority of U.S. adults prefer a program that offers a choice of abstinence and effective methods of contraceptive use to our teens. Despite overwhelming public opinion, the government continues to fund over $200 million annually towards abstinence-only programs that has been proven does not work. The credibility of this article is supported by the 26 detailed resources listed from databases providing detailed facts of government funding for abstinence-only programs. The method of conducting the cross-sectional survey, choosing participants at random regardless of sex, age, and socio-economic class further supports the information gathered is credible. Amy Bleakley, the lead author graduated from Columbia University where she received her MPH and PhD in Sociomedical Science, currently serving as Policy Research Scientist at the Health Communication Group of the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania studying adolescent sexual behavior. Contributing authors Douglas Kirby, PhD and Martin Fishbein, PhD are researchers of sexual education at the same university. The authors have contributed to over 200 articles, chapters to professional books, and journals. The data gathered from this survey will be used to support the importance of funding sex education programs that work (Bleakley, Hennessy, & Fishbein, 2006). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2009), Disproportionate impact on racial minorities persists. Retrieved on February 24, 2010, from http://www.cdc.gov/nchhstp/newsroom/STDsurveillancepressrelease.html The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) website reports the increase in recent years of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), mainly chlamydia and gonorrhea among black women 15 to 24 years of age. Tables and statistics are available to illustrate the increase of STD cases based on gender, age, and year. Although, the article primarily focuses on female minorities, the CDC acknowledges the need for programs that educate prevention and early detection for our young adults. The health consequences...
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