Tda 2.5 Schools as Organisations

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TDA 2.5 Schools as organisations

Task 1 Links to learning outcome 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, assessment criteria 1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 4.1, 4.2, 5.1, 5.2, 6.1, 6.2 and 6.3.

Identify the main types of state and independent schools •Describe the characteristics of the different types of schools in relation to educational stage(s) and school governance •Describe roles and responsibilities of:

-School governors
-Senior management team
-Other statutory roles e.g. SENCO
-Teachers

Describe the roles of external professionals who may work with a school e.g. educational psychologist •Define the meaning of:

-Aims
-Values

Describe with examples how schools may demonstrate and uphold their aims •Describe with examples how schools may demonstrate and uphold their values •Identify the laws and codes of practice affecting work in schools •Describe why school have policies and procedures

Identify the policies and procedures school may have relating to:

-Staff

-Pupil welfare

-Teaching and learning

Identify the roles and responsibilities of national and local government for education policy and practice •Describe the role of schools in national policies relating to children, young people and families •Describe the roles of other organisations working with children and young people and how these may impact on the work in schools.

Identify the main types of state and independent schools

Links to learning outcome 1, assessment criteria 1.1

AND
Describe the characteristics of the different types of schools in relation to educational stage(s) and school governance

Links to learning outcome 1, assessment criteria 1.2

All children in England between the ages of 5 and 16 are entitled to a free place at a state school. There are four main types of state schools that receive funding from the local authority. They all follow the national curriculum and are regularly inspected by OFSTED.

Community schools - Run by the local authority, which employ the staff, own the lands and building, and decides which admissions criteria to use. Community schools have strong links with the local community and they usually offer their facilities for childcare and adult learning classes. (I do work placement at a community school)

Foundation and trust schools – Foundation schools are run by their own governing body, which employs the staff and sets the admissions criteria. Land and buildings are owned by the governing body or a charitable foundation. Trust schools are like foundation schools but they have an outside partnership which forms a charitable trust. The outside partner could be a business or educational charity. They try to explore new way of working to raise standards. The governing body decides whether to become a trust school with parents having a say. Voluntary-aided schools - Are mainly religious or faith schools. The governing body employs staff and sets the admissions criteria. The school buildings and land is owned by a charity which could be a religious organisation. They also appoint some of the members of the governing body.

Voluntary-controlled schools- Are similar to voluntary-aided schools, but are run by the local authority. The local authority employs the staff and set the admissions criteria. The land and buildings and land are owned by a charity usually a religious organisation, which also appoint some members of the governing body.

There are;
Specialist schools- which follow the National Curriculum and focus on a particular subject area like, sports, media or technology. Academies- which are independently managed, they are set up by sponsors from business, faith or voluntary groups in partnership with the Department for Education (DfE) and the local authority. Together they fund the land and buildings, with the government covering the running costs. City Technology Colleges- These are...
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