Systematic Approach to Managing Ohs

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MODULE 1

SYTEMATIC

APPROACH TO

MANAGING OHS

ASSESSMENT

Module 1

PROJECT 1

Write a detailed report on the implementation of a systematic approach to managing OHS. Your report might be theoretical or based on your specific workplace.

Ensure that you include the following:
Requirements for record-keeping
Sources of OHS information and data
Consultative arrangements
OHS action plans
OHS specialists (internal or external) and technical advisors Other functional areas
Proposed changes to the workplace
Stakeholders

Construction Australia is the company that I am employed by. Our company offers services in refractory installation to all major industries. We are involved in the construction and maintenance of boilers, kilns, ovens, incinerators, etc. in power generation plants, heat treatment plants, chemical plants, steel mills, oil refineries and many more. We conduct high risk work such as demolition, confined space entry, working at heights, and work at extreme temperatures mainly in major hazard facilities.

Due to the nature of our work it is vital that we have a system in place to manage Occupational Health and Safety (OHS). A systematic approach to managing OHS allows us to follow a structured framework that ensures primarily, we reduce the risks of injury or illness in the workplace or anyone affected by our activities and that we comply with all relevant laws and legislation.

The main elements of an Occupational Health and safety management system (OHSMS) are: •Commitment and policy
Planning
Implementation
Measurement and evaluation
Review and improvement

These elements are incorporated into the system and involve consultation at all stages with stakeholders and key personnel of our organisation. The basis of this approach is a cycle of continuous improvement as illustrated below in fig. 1:

When establishing a more systematic approach to managing safety, it is helpful to understand where your organisation is in terms of OHS maturity. Four levels of system maturity can be considered: •Immature (Troubled)

Reactive (Responsive)
Attentive (Managed)
Mature (Value-Adding)
Our company is at a mature level as we have established structures, systems and processes in place. We also have a shared belief that OHS is a critical aspect of personal and organisational performance and focus continually on improvement and ways to reduce risks. An effective OHSMS requires the participation of all parts of the organisation. To gain this commitment from people, senior management takes an active role in leadership, allocation of resources, consultative meetings and regular reviews of OHS.

The first step in the systematic approach to OHS is to develop a comprehensive OHS policy that states the overall objectives and sets out the company’s commitment to health and safety. The policy should be sufficiently clear and be capable of being read by all relevant parties, internal and external. The policy should be endorsed by the most senior person, such as the CEO or managing director. Beroa’s OHS policy is attached to appendix A. Action plans are a vital part of the planning and implementation process. The organisation needs to determine the key regulatory requirements they must meet and also get an understanding of their major OHS risks and how they will be identified.

Objectives, targets and key performance indicators (KPI’s) need to be set. These should incorporate both lead (e.g. number of safety audits conducted) and lag (e.g. number of lost time injuries) indicators. Lead indicators are commonly referred to as Positive Performance Indicators (PPI’s) that focus on assessing how successful an organisation is performing. Using a combination of both lead and lag indicators will provide the best outcomes. A plan is vital to ensure targets are reached in a systematic way and it should be linked to the organisation’s strategic...
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