Superstition and Black Cat

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  • Topic: Superstition, Omen, Luck
  • Pages : 19 (5739 words )
  • Download(s) : 182
  • Published : February 24, 2013
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Definition:
1. Excessively credulous belief in and reverence for supernatural beings. 2. A widely held but unjustified belief in supernatural causation leading to certain consequences of an action or event, or a practice... Superstition is a belief in supernatural causality: that one event leads to the cause of another without any physical process linking the two events, such as astrology, omens, witchcraft, etc., that contradicts natural science. Population:

1. All the inhabitants of a particular town, area, or country. 2. A particular section, group, or type of people or animals living in an area or country.

Society:

|The aggregate of people living together in a more or less ordered community. | |The community of people living in a particular region and having shared customs, laws, and organizations. | | | | |

Social psychology:

Branch of psychology concerned with the personality, attitudes, motivations, and behaviour of the individual or group in the context of social interaction. The field emerged in the U.S. in the 1920s. Topics include the attribution of social status based on perceptual cues, the influence of social factors (such as peers) on a person's attitudes and beliefs, the functioning of small groups and large organizations, and the dynamics of face-to-face interactions.

Attitude:

An attitude is an expression of favor or disfavor toward a person, place, thing, or event (the attitude object). Prominent psychologist Gordon Allport once described attitudes "the most distinctive and indispensable concept in contemporary social psychology."[1] In lay language, attitude may refer to the distinct concept of mood, or be especially synonymous with teenage rebellion. An attitude can be defined as a positive or negative evaluation of people, objects, event, activities, ideas, or just about anything in your environment.

Measuring attitudes

Many measurements and scales are used to examine attitudes. Attitudes can be difficult to measure because measurement is arbitrary, meaning people have to give attitudes a scale to measure it against, and attitudes are ultimately a hypothetical construct that cannot be observed directly. Following the explicit-implicit dichotomy, attitudes can be examined through direct and indirect measures. Explicit measures tend to rely on self-reports or easily observed behaviors. These tend to involve bipolar scales (e.g., good-bad, favorable-unfavorable, support-oppose, etc.).[5] Explicit measures can also be used by measuring the straightforward attribution of characteristics to nominate groups, such as "I feel that baptists are....?" or "I think that men are...?"[6] Likert scales and other self-reports are also commonly used. Implicit measures are not consciously directed and are assumed to be automatic, which may make implicit measures more valid and reliable than explicit measures (such as self-reports). For example, people can be motivated such that they find it socially desirable to appear to have certain attitudes. An example of this is that people can hold implicit prejudicial attitudes, but express explicit attitudes that report little prejudice. Implicit measures help account for these situations and look at attitudes that a person may not be aware of or want to show.[7] Implicit measures therefore usually rely on an indirect measure of attitude. For example, the Implicit Association Test (IAT) examines the strength between the target concept and an attribute element by considering the latency in which a person can examine two response keys when each has two meanings. With little time to carefully examine what the...
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