Summary of the Brain Asymmetry Experiment

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BSummary of Brain Asymmetry
Introduction
In the Brain Asymmetry experiment, the independent variable is the construction of the chimeric faces: one has the younger face on the left and the other has the younger face on the right. The dependent variable is the percentage of reports that chimeric face with the younger face on the left looked younger. The group of left-handed subects acted as a control group and helped to rule out the general left-view bias. It is hypothesized that percentage of reports that chimeric faces with younger face on the left looked younger will be bigger for the experimental group (i.e. the right-handed participants) than the control group (i.e. the left-handed participants). Method

Participants are asked to indicate their handedness prior to the trials. Every trial contains two chimeric faces. The way chimeric face is constructed is by combining a half of each of two different faces. In each trial, participants are asked to choose the younger looking of the two chimeric faces. In reality, the two faces are mirror images of each other; therefore, the age characteristic of the two is the same. Results

The class data shows the percentage of reports that chimeric with the younger face on the left look younger within the right-handed group is 57.34% (N=36). The statistic for the left-handed group is 66.67% (N=3). My personal data matches with the class data (N=1). The findings do not support the experimental hypothesis. Discussion

Both the class data and global averages do not support the hypothesis that the percentage of reports that chimeric faces with the younger left-halve will be smaller for left-handed participants. In fact, the opposite results have been obtained. This may indicate that the difference between left and right hemispheres is not big enough to be detectable.
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