Practical Report

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Abstract

Mead & Hampson (1996) developed a study involving the divided visual field paradigm and a phonological rhyme/non-rhyme task to test the speed and accurateness of either side of the brain. This study was used to investigate functional asymmetry between the left and right hemispheres in phonological processing. The research was taken out equally on 15 male and 15 females London Metropolitan University students ranging from ages 18 – 35 years old. They were all specifically chosen to be right–handed and had English as their first language thus providing a fair experiment to see whether our left hemisphere (left side of the brain) or the right hemisphere is faster and more accurate. In conclusion using the mean and standard deviation to determine our hypothesis, it was calculated that the left hemisphere had a higher mean and standard deviation score compared to the right hemisphere.

Introduction

The cerebral hemispheres are very similar in appearance, but they differ significantly in their structure. One of the best known differences between the two structures is motor control; the right hemisphere controls the left half of the body and the left hemisphere controls the right side of the body. These motor control differences were discovered mainly through the examination of paralysis caused by strokes or other damage to a specific hemisphere. Even though the two hemispheres have different functions, they do not work independently of each other. They communicate back and forth across the corpus callosum. This is not an equal partnership however; one hemisphere usually dominates over the other, an effect best illustrated by the fact that most people are only good with either their right or left hand. In most cases the left hemisphere is believed to be the dominate hemisphere. Since 1836, there has been a lot of research and studies on whether the brain is symmetrical or not. Over the years there has been very debatable discussions based on this...
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