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Summary of Godzilla’s Footprint

In Godzilla’s Footprint, author Steve Ryfle begins by stating that the film Godzilla was not released to the Unites States until 2004, fifty years after the original release in Japan. Ryfle goes on to quote critics that were flabbergasted by the contrast of two films - the original Japanese film with its primitive special effects and recollection of the horrific aftermath of the atomic bombings, versus the re-cut, copy and pasted version showed to the United states as a monster-mash entertainment film.

Beginning with the opening scene in the film, the Lucky Dragon incident seemed to resonate deeply with the Japanese citizens as it had recently occurred and made national headlines. A small tuna trawler headed east of Japan towards Bikini Atoll in the heart of the Marshall Islands. Unaware of the present dangers ahead, the crew continued on. Simultaneously, a hydrogen bomb 1000 times more powerful than Hiroshima’s, was about to be detonated. The oblivious crew located a short distance away, were hit with the aftershock, only beginning to feel the effects of their impending death on their journey home.

Based on all of the recent tragedies Japan had endured, combined with the release of numerous other monster movies, it was decided that Japan was going to make its first. Ishiro Hondawas the man who was put in charge of productions, as he was a man who endured serving in the war and ultimately came home to eerily empty streets, grief-stricken survivors and mass destruction - a portrait that would later be used in the directors creations. These personal perspectives inspired Honda’s vision of the film to metaphorically compare Godzilla to the atomic bomb.
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