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 No Brain Too Small  BIOLOGY 

Transport

normal

flaccid

isotonic

turgid

flaccid

turgid does not
explode

normal

flaccid

plasmolysed

Cell gains water and become
turgid (stiff and hard), does not
explode because of the rigid cell
wall.
Cells lose water and become
flaccid (floppy). If it keeps loosing
water, water leaves the vacuole
and membrane pulls away from
wall. Becomes plasmolysed.

Excytosis adds to the cell membrane while endocytosis removes part of the cell membrane.
Paramecium

Osmoregulation.
This is the control of water inside a cell or organism. It is very important if you are a unicellular organism living in fresh water. Water is continually moving into the organism by osmosis (passive transport) and unless the excess water is removed the unicellular organism will explode/die. To prevent this, the unicellular organism has contractile vacuoles which collect and pump the Excess water out of the organism (active transport).

contractile vacuole

contractile vacuole

osmosis

hypotonic

Plant cells in different solutions:

phagocytosis

diffusion

Exocytosis: this is the removal of substance from the cell and is basically the reverse of endocytosis.

pinocytosis

turgid/explodes

Cell gains water and become turgid
(stiff and hard).
If water keeps entering by osmosis
animal cells will explode.
Cells lose water and become flaccid
(floppy)

Endocytosis: this is the taking in of substances into the cell by the infolding of the cell membrane, to produce a
vesicle.
If it’s fluid being taken in –
pinocytosis (cell drinking) or if it’s
solids - phagocytosis (cell eating).

endocytosis

hypertonic

Red blood cells in different solutions:
hypotonic
isotonic
hypertonic

Types of active transport:

concentration gradient

Osmosis is a special type of diffusion, where water moves across a selectively permeable membrane from high water concentration to low water...
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