Study on Feasibility of Growing Medicinal Plant Crop in India

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Herb, Herbalism, Herbal
  • Pages : 6 (1568 words )
  • Download(s) : 387
  • Published : June 7, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
STUDY ON FEASIBILITY OF GROWING MEDICINAL PLANT CROP IN INDIA

Introduction
1.There is a global resurgence in the traditional and alternative health care system. We in India are fortunate to have a system of medicines which date back to more than 3000 years and have deep rooted societal acceptance to it. 2.Medicinal Plants form the major resource base of our indigenous health care traditions. Ayurveda, Unani, Sidha and Homeopathy System of medicines offer health care solutions to a large segment of our population including those living in remote and interior areas. 3.Our reach and acceptability of AYUSH System (Department of Ayurveda, Yoga and, Naturopathy, Unani, Sidha and Homeopathy) under Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, both nationally as well as globally, is dependent on uninterrupted availability of quality plant based raw material. Aim

4.The Aim is to study the Feasibility of Growing Medicinal Plant Crop in India and its potential market. Scope
5.For ease of understanding, the study has been carried out under the following heads :- (a) Need and Justification.
(b) Production Methods and On Farming Processing Requirements. (c) Post Harvest Management and Marketing.
(d) Recommendations.
Need and Justification
6.More than 90% of the species used in trade continue to be sourced from the wild, of which 2/3rd are harvested by destructive means. More than 6000 plant species are known and are used in the Indian System of Medicines in our country. The commercial demand for the botanical raw drugs has put the medicinal plant resource under stress. 7.The industrial demand for the medicinal plant resource has been on the rise due to the worldwide buoyancy in the herbal sector engaged in production of herbal health care formulations. In India nearly 9500 registered herbal industries, and a

2
large number of unregistered cottage level herbal units depend upon the continuous supply of medicinal plants for manufacture of herbal medicinal formulations based on Indian System of Medicine. 8.With more than 95% AYUSH products being plant based, the raw material base need to be shifted from forests to the cultivated source for its long term sustainability. The global trade require products of standard phyto-chemical composition free from heavy metals and other toxic impurities and certified to be organic or GAP compliant. This is possible only through cultivation source where chain of custody regime is easier to maintain. 9. The Indian share of world herbal trade is less than 1%. Even here, the export of herbal products is largely in the form of raw herbs, ie, 2/3rd. This needs to be changed considering a US $ 120 billion herbal market. It is for this reason that the AYUSH Scheme provides for support to value addition and processing linked to the clusters of cultivation of selected plants in demand. 10.The study carried out by National Mission on Medicinal Plants estimates the following data :-

Herbal Industry Rural Exports Total Households (a) Annual demand
of botanical raw drugs 1,77,000 MT 86,000 MT 56,500 MT 3,19,500MT (b) Annual trade
value of botanical
raw drugs (Rs) 627.90 cr 86 cr 354.80 cr 1068.70 cr (c) Amla is highest consumed by domestic herbal industry. (d) Isabgol is the major export herb and Senna, Henna and Myrobalans Account for 70% of total export plant raw drugs.

(e) The Annual Domestic Turnover of Herbal Industry in India is Rs 8,800 crs.
(f) The Annual Production & Supply of Botanical Raw Drugs is as follows:- (i)Wild Harvest (forest etc) – 1,20,000 MT (in > 52% forest area).

3
(ii)Cultivation – 1,21,400 MT (on 1,18,000 hectres of land). (iii)Imports – 37,483 MT.

(g) Out of the 960 Medicinal Plant species traded, 178 are in high volume (more than 100 MT per year). These...
tracking img