Stakeholder Analysis

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Small Grants for Site Support Groups supported by the DGIS/TMF-BirdLife funding scheme

Guidelines on Stakeholder analysis

Contents 1. How to identify the stakeholders ................................................................................................................. 1 2. Stakeholder analysis.................................................................................................................................... 1 3. The Stakeholder Analysis Report ................................................................................................................ 3

These guidelines are part of a set of five that BirdLife is using to ensure that projects at IBAs have the participation and ownership of local people, and to help design actions that achieve the linked objectives of improved local livelihoods and IBA conservation. The guidelines should be used as a linked and complementary set. The series comprises: Guidelines on Project Planning: The Logical Framework Approach, a Project Design and Analysis Tool Guidelines for Participatory Poverty Assessment at IBAs and the identification of poverty reduction indicators Guidelines on Stakeholder analysis Guidelines for Site Support Group Institutional Analysis Guidelines for basic monitoring of Important Bird Areas Feedback on the guidelines, so that they can be developed and improved, is much appreciated. Please send your comments to david.thomas@birdlife.org

The main source for these guidelines was: Bibby, C.J and Alder, C. 2003 (eds) The conservation project manual. Cambridge, UK: BP Conservation Programme

1. How to identify the stakeholders
The objectives of stakeholder identification are twofold: to get a clear understanding as to who the main stakeholders are, and to understand their values, beliefs, problems and attitudes towards the project. Stakeholder identification will also give you a good understanding as to who should be directly involved in project planning. Internal stakeholders (i.e. those included within the likely partnership for your project) are relatively easy to identify. You should by now have a good idea about the objectives, strengths and weaknesses of your team and project partners, and the initial project idea should give you a sufficient insight of which specialist knowledge will be required to implement the project. External stakeholders (i.e. those likely to remain outside the project partnership but who may be affected by the project or have some other interest in its outcome) are much more difficult to identify. The first task (often overlooked) is to differentiate sufficiently between your stakeholders. It is not good enough for example merely to limit the definition of villagers around a national park to ‘local people’. There are likely to be huge differences within this group and the aim should be, as much as practical, to define homogeneous groups with similar characteristics. In its simplest form, people who know the project situation very well can simply brainstorm the list of important stakeholders and analyse their characteristics in the form of a stakeholder analysis (see below). However, more often than not, planners need to analyse the situation in the field. For simple projects, it might be sufficient to consult key informants. These are individuals who know the local situation well, such as village heads, local government officials, local teachers and religious leaders. Larger projects will often require more detailed specialist studies to fully understand the socio-economic environment of the project. Clearly, the most direct method of involving stakeholders is to involve everybody directly in the project planning. While this is feasible for some small projects, it is clearly impossible to do if large numbers of people are involved. You should therefore consult directly with every stakeholder group through formal and/or informal surveys, group discussions or similar tools of participatory...
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