Speech on Becoming an Organ Donor

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Preparation Outline
Organ Donation: by Samantha Hess
GENERAL PURPOSE: To persuade the audience to become organ donors. SPECIFIC PURPOSE: To persuade my audience to become organ donors by informing them of what it is, how it works, the myths of organ donations, how to become an organ donor, and the benefits of being one. THESIS: The need is constantly growing for organ donors and it is very simple to become one. Transplantation gives hope to thousands of people with organ failure and provides many others with renewed lives.

Introduction
I. Attention getting device: How many of you are registered organ donors? (Give them time to raise their hands) According to the United Network for Organ Sharing, as of November 18, 2012, 116,497 people are waiting for an organ, but only 74,374 of those people are active, meaning they can receive a transplant at any given time. 18 people will die each day waiting for one and one organ donor can save up to 8 lives. II. Thesis: The need is constantly growing for organ donors and it is very simple to become one. Transplantation gives hope to thousands of people with organ failure and provides many others with renewed lives. III. Preview: Today, I am going to discuss what organ donation is, what organs can be donated, how it works, myths about organ donation, how to become an organ donor, and the benefits of being one. Hopefully after I have discussed these issues, you will realize how important this topic truly is and become one yourself and give the gift of life. IV. Credibility Statement: I myself am a registered organ donor, so this topic is of great importance to me. It has impacted me in a major way. My cousin had a son born with hydrocephalus and cerebral palsy. He died in early March, three days before his fifth birthday. My cousin made the heroic decision to donate some of his organs, and has thus far changed two peoples’ lives. Also, my mother was born with pancreas divisum, in which parts of the pancreas fail to join together. This defect has caused many complications throughout my mother’s life. Her father passed away from pancreatic cancer when he was 51, and my mom was informed that she may need a pancreas transplant in the future to prolong her life. V. Topic relevance: I believe this is crucial for everyone in this room. Whether it’s you, a family member, or even a friend that needs a transplant, it is very important to be aware of the benefits of being an organ donor and realizing how many lives you can save. Life is short, and never guaranteed, so I believe we should do all we can to save as many lives as possible.

Body
I. Today, I will help all of you understand what it means to donate. a. There are two types of organ donations.
1. Being a deceased donor means your organs are donated after you have passed away. a. According to Dana Lustbader, in 2011, in the Journal of Palliative Medicine, there are two types of donations after a person has passed away. 1. Donation after death by neurologic criteria occurs when a patient meets brain death criteria. 2. Donation after cardiac death occurs when a decision is made to discontinue mechanical ventilation and all other life-sustaining treatments or when a seriously ill patient is expected to die shortly after such treatments are stopped. 2. Being a living donor means your organs are donated while you are still alive, so the organs are obviously limited to which you can donate. a. According to the United Network for Organ Sharing, the first successful living organ donation was performed in 1954between identical twins. Ronald donated a kidney to his twin brother Richard. Richard died eight years later due to causes unrelated to the transplant, and Ronald passed away in 2010. 3. You can be both. You can donate part of your organs when you are alive and donate the rest after you have passed away. 4. According to Klein and associates, in the American...
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