Sources of Law

Page 1 of 3

Sources of Law

By | Jan. 2008
Page 1 of 3
SOURCES OF LAW

All the sources have a relevance to the operation of business and management which means that managers and employees have to be aware of them and their different features.

PRINCIPAL FEATURES

1. STATUTE. law made by the Government known also as legislation and statute.

a. This is law made by Parliament. A Bill goes through several procedures and debates in Parliament and when it is finally agreed it receives the Royal Assent. This is now a formality as our system of government is known as a constitutional monarchy. This means that the Queen is the Head of State but holds no real power as this is vested in the government.

b. Once an Act is passed it remains law until it is amended or repealed by a later Act of Parliament. Therefore, some Acts are old and yet still are relevant modern law. Some examples of particular relevance are The PARTNERSHIP ACT 1890 and The GAMING ACT 1845.

c. It is very relevant to business and management with such impact as in The Employment Rights Act 1996, The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and the Companies Act 1985. All of these are relevant to the study of this unit.

d. Statutes can cover criminal law and civil law issues.

2. DELEGATED LEGISLATION made by bodies authorised by the Government to make regulations to deal with certain types of behaviour.

a. These do not go through Parliament

b. They can be Orders in Council
Statutory Instruments
By laws.

c. The Courts can become involved if the delegated body acts beyond its powers.

d. The reasons for the growth in the use of delegated legislation arise from the following facts:-

Lack of Parliamentary time to debate.

Complex 21st. century society. Operation of the welfare state etc.

Many matters are of a technical nature

Delegated legislation has a particular relevance to management in the area of health and safety. In 1992 The Management of Health and Safety at Work...