Solar Cooker

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  • Topic: Solar cooker, Solar furnace, Solar Cookers International
  • Pages : 8 (1995 words )
  • Download(s) : 495
  • Published : January 4, 2013
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Abstract

In this report we will be discussing the Basic design, Material & Types of solar cooker,

This report will explain the advantages, disadvantages of solar cooker & solar cooking and the challenges to change traditional cooking habits & what social & economic effect it has on society.

In this report we are looking at the perspectives’ on how the solar cooker has helped us in fighting the ongoing deforestation & preserving the environment.

It explains how the solar cooker helped in fighting against poverty & the use of renewable energy in rural areas.

Table of contents

Introduction
Solar cooking is the simplest, safest, most convenient way to cook food without consuming fuels or heating up the kitchen. It reduces the use of traditional fossil fuel used for cooking e.g. wood, gas and reduce carbon footprints. It uses sunlight as its energy source. Because they use no fuel and they cost nothing to run, humanitarian organizations are promoting their use worldwide to help slow deforestation and desertification, caused by using wood as fuel for cooking. Solar cookers when used properly & safely can conveniently cook all types of food, including meats, grains, legumes, vegetables and fruits. Harmful food microbes, including bacteria and viruses, are killed when heated to 65ºC (150ºF). This is called pasteurization. Food cooks at 82ºC (180ºF) to 91ºC (195ºF), and is therefore free from disease-causing organisms when fully cooked. Simple solar cookers cook gently at temperatures just above these, so foods maintain moisture and nutrients, and rarely burn or overcook. Some solar cookers can cook at temperatures much higher than this. Solar cookers require direct sunlight to function properly. Shadows, clouds and inclement weather limit their effectiveness. Solar cookers, however, are efficient in clear skies in day times when the sun is most intense between 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. Solar cooker are more successful & practical for people living in climates that are generally dry and sunny for at least six months of the year. Latitudes between the equator and 40º are usually best.

They are now being used by thousands of people around the globe who suffer from fuel scarcity but have abundant sunshine.

They are mostly popular in poorer countries of Africa & Asia. Countries worth mentioning are China, India, and Pakistan. Sudan, Lesotho

The solar cookers are an important contribution towards halting the deforestation process And they thereby preserve the environment. At the same time they help in fighting poverty.

Beside environmental reasons there are also economical and practical reasons To favors the solar cooker.

History of solar cooker
The history of modern solar cooking started over two hundred fifty years ago .Looking for the beginnings of what we now call solar cooking, we find some figures worth mentioning. The first known western solar oven was build by a Swiss naturalist named Horace-Bénédict de Saussure in 1767. He cooked fruits in a primitive solar box cooker that reached temperatures of 190°F. He was the modern inventor of solar cookers. In 1830 English astronomer Sir John Herschell cooked food in a similar insulated box on an expedition to South Africa. In 1877 Augustin Mouchot devised solar cookers for French soldiers in Algeria. He was the first to combine the box/oven heat trap and burning mirrors concepts to create solar ovens and also wrote the first book on Solar Energy. In 1876 India W. Adams developed an octagonal oven with 8 mirrors which cooked rations for 7 soldiers in 2 hours .Dr. Charles G. Abbot, Secretary of the American Smithsonian Institution, was the first recorded inventor of solar cookers in which the heat collector was outside in the sun but the cooker itself was in the house, with heat carried from collector to cooker by circulating...
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