Slavery and Civil War

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DBQ 7. Slavery and the Civil War, 1846-1860

Slavery is something that many Americans cannot forget today but it was something that not many knew about in the 1840s. All of us are away of it. Back then it was something the North was not much aware of it and in the South it was domination of slavery. Many Northerners had no clue what so ever what slavery was until they were provided with information. As blacks started to move into America, they were forced to be laborers. They became slaves of the greedy and rich Americans. Once time passed by and the need for slaves increased. The needed of slaves caused many problems and many whites fought over this. The southerners wanted slavery while on the other side the northerners who never heard of slavery wanted to free slaves. This need of slaves caused the beginning of the Civil War. Many acts and comprises as Kansas Nebraska Act, Bleeding Kansas, Compromise of 1850 and the new Fugitive Slave Law. These acts prove that slavery was the cause of the civil war.

The Kansas Nebraska Act was a act that created the territories of Kansas and Nebraska, opening new lands for settlement, and had the effect of repealing the Missouri Compromise of 1820 by allowing settlers in those territories to determine through Popular Sovereignty whether they would allow slavery within each territory.  It became problematic when popular sovereignty was written into the proposal so that the voters of the moment would decide whether slavery would be allowed. The result was that pro- and anti-slavery elements flooded into Kansas with the goal of voting slavery up or down, leading to a bloody civil war there. Bleeding Kansas was a series of violent political confrontations involving anti-slavery Free-States and pro-slavery elements that took place in the Kansas Territory and the neighboring towns of Missouri between 1854 and 1861. These acts presaged the American Civil War.

Ralph Waldo Emerson describes how he was unaware about slavery...
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