Serving in Flordia Argumentive

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In the essay “Serving in Florida,” Barbara Ehrenreich records managers being the “class enemy” and how low level jobs are inadequate in terms of pay. She states that most managers and assistant managers were prior underdog employees of the restaurant business and they are only there to make the big bucks for corporations. Ehrenreich bemoans how managers are the “class enemy”; for instance, they never allow servers to take a one second break but the manager’s just sit down all the time and don’t do their actual job. She also states the fact servers will have to attend mandatory meetings, and the managers threaten the servers to have their rights be taken away including lockers, breaks, and the managers rifling through their belongings without personal consent. Not only is management a problem, but the low-income is far from a comfortable living situation. The author seeks her own survey among her fellow co-workers about where they live, some in cars because they cannot afford to live in a hotel/home, and are living in nearby hotels because the gas to drive to their job is just too expensive. She defends “It strikes me, in my middle-class solipsism, that there is gross improvidence in some of these arrangements,” and she points out that she is shocked for the fact no body plans for their future. Ehrenreich finds a second job at Jerry’s to take on so she doesn’t find herself not having a place to live, nor gas to drive, or food to eat. Ehrenreich gives examples of how to deal with exhaustions management and tells herself “Ideally, at some point you enter what serves call a “rhythm” and psychologists term a “flow state,” where signals pass from the sense organs directly to the muscles, bypassing the cerebral cortex, and a Zen-like emptiness sets in.”, while being undercover as a server in a minimum wage setting.
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