Se7En

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EvaMarie Wiltbank
REL 207
Se7en

1. The Seven Deadly Sins and their counterpart, the Seven Heavenly Virtues are:
1. Gluttony (over-indulgence) and Temperance (self-restraint)
2. Greed (avarice) and Charity (giving)
3. Sloth (laziness/idleness) and Diligence (zeal/integrity)
4. Wrath (anger) and Forgiveness (composure)
5. Pride (vanity) and Humility (humbleness)
6. Lust (excessive sexual appetite) and Chastity (purity)
7. Envy (jealousy) and Kindness (admiration)
The Seven Deadly Sins first originated from Evagrius of Pontus (or Evagrius the Solitary), an Egyptian monk who derived a list of eight offenses considered most egregious to God. Even though Evagrius was accused of heresy, his work lived on through Christianity; in particular the Catholic Church. Pope Gregory I revised the list to seven in AD 590 and ranked them based on the degree to which they offended God, most serious to last. I spent a lot of time reading over the information on deadlysins.com, and to be honest there wasn’t a lot that surprised me or was “new” information. You speak frequently in class of being raised Catholic and so was I. You and I both know that this information was drummed into our heads as “good little Catholic girls” from the time we were old enough to understand what sin was, which for me, was the grand old age of six. What I found amusing was the writers’ interpretation of Gilligan’s Island being an allegory for the Seven Deadly Sins; THAT was really cool!

2. I believe that the things Detective David Mills hold sacred are:
A. The title of detective; you can tell by how vehemently he defends that title.
B. Respect; you can tell by his eagerness to prove himself to his superiors to earn it from them.
C. His wife and his relationship with her; you can tell by the way he becomes protective and secretive when speaking to her on the phone and then defensive when he discovers Somerset has been invited to dinner. In the end, the act of killing Doe as a reaction to discovering “What’s in the box” is also a glaring show of how important she was to him.

D. Independence; he does not want to be “tied down” to his desk in the office by waiting around for Doe to make another move nor does he want to be hampered by the rules of investigation according to Somerset.

The things that Detective Lt. William Somerset holds sacred are:
A. Innocence, especially that of children; wanting to know if the child saw the first murder in the movie (the wife killing the husband) and talking about his own lost child to Tracey then encouraging her to “spoil that child every chance you get” if she decided to keep it.

B. Education and Information; not only does he do research for himself, he assists Mills even when he’s supposed to be done with the case by giving him the appropriate materials to start finding answers. I believe it also shows how important it is to him when he actually breaks the rules and pays for information that they are not supposed to have access to nor should even exist!

C. Order; this is evident not only in the way he keeps his apartment and desk but in the mere fact that he became a cop – whose primary purpose is to “keep order” among the people.

The things that John Doe holds sacred are:
A. Virtue (the Seven Heavenly Virtues in particular); in a very perverse sense, of course, this is shown by his punishment of those he feels are guilty of the Seven Deadly Sins. He vehemently defends his “work” in annihilating the sinners. His apartment is filled with representations of “faith” (crosses, bibles, etc.) making it appear that he values the Divine itself above all else, yet next to it in cases you have canned spaghetti, a bloody lawbook and Victor’s finger - trophies of his atrocities against the Divine.

B. Recognition; this is evident in the statement, “What I’m doing will be puzzled over and studied and followed forever.” He wants someone to pay attention to what he’s saying and actually...
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