Scoping Report

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Assignment – Scoping Opinion
Developers can request an opinion on what information should be included within an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). This is called a scoping opinion. The purpose of a scoping opinion is to provide clear advice on the likely issues to be considered during the EIA process. Your task is to produce a 1,500 word scoping opinion (30% of module marks) You should provide;

1. A brief ‘screening decision’ on why EIA is required (i.e. the regulatory basis). 2. A report on what information should be included in the EIS. o Focus on significant impacts that are project specific. You will need to think critically about what information will be required. o You might find it useful to refer to the regulations on the structure and legislative components of an Environmental Impact Statement. This may help you to structure your report. o Where appropriate you can suggest methods and means for gathering information. o Where appropriate you may also provide advice on information requirements relating to mitigation measures and / or alternatives. o Do no reproduce any information you may find online – it will be noticed! However, background reading / case studies on scoping requests and responses is recommended.

Choose one of the four following options

Proposed Nuclear Power Station near Oldbury On Severn, South Gloucestershire 2009.

In January 2009, RWE AG (RWE) and E.ON AG (E.ON) announced the creation of a joint venture (JV) to develop new nuclear power stations in the UK. Now called Horizon Nuclear Power Ltd, the JV aspires to develop at least 6 gigawatts (GW) of electricity generation on land adjacent to the existing Magnox stations at Oldbury and Wylfa.

Site Description

The Oldbury site is located on the eastern bank of the Severn Estuary within the administrative area of South Gloucestershire Council. The nearest settlements are Oldbury on Severn (and the neighbouring community of Shepperdine) and Thornbury. The site is located immediately north east of the existing Oldbury nuclear power station.

The land proposed for the permanent development covers an area of approximately 150ha, largely comprising mainly agricultural grassland. Other land may be required for construction, access or potential ancillary developments. The nominated site boundary includes two former silt lagoons associated with the existing power station. The Severn Estuary forms the north west boundary of the site. In addition to the existing Oldbury nuclear power station to the immediate south west of the site, there are a number of houses, farms and associated buildings to the south and north east of the site. Existing access to the site is by Shepperdine Road, a minor road connecting to Oldbury in the south and Rockhampton in the east.

Most of the site, and much of the surrounding area, is situated at an elevation of approximately 6.0 to 6.6m AOD. Surface drainage is achieved through an extensive network of relatively deep drainage channels which generally drain southwards towards Oldbury Pill which discharges to the Severn Estuary.

The north western boundary with the Severn Estuary is formed by coastal flood defence works that extend along the shore to the south west and north east. The flood defence consists of a substantial earth bund rising several metres above adjacent ground level. The bund incorporates erosion protection in the form of stone armouring on the seaward side.

The adjacent Oldbury nuclear power station is constructed on raised ground immediately south west of the proposed development area. It is a Magnox gas cooled reactor, with a prestressed concrete pressure vessel and was opened in 1967 with an output in excess of 600 MW, but presently runs at reduced capacity of 435 MW. The life of the power station has been extended beyond the date originally set for the commencement of defuelling and decommissioning. Currently, the station is due to cease operation in 2011...
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