School Marketing Plan

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Alethea
Marketing Plan

Contents

Executive Summary3
Situation Analysis4
Market Characteristics4
Trends and Drivers4
Legal, Political and Economic factors4
Alethea School5
Objectives5
Target Market5
SWOT Analysis6
Strengths6
Weaknesses6
Opportunities6
Threats7
Market Definition and Segmentation7
Competitive forces9
Goals, Outcomes, and Performance Measures9
Goal One: High Quality Learning Opportunities9
Goal Two: Excellence in Student Learning Outcomes10
Goal Three: Highly Responsive and Responsible School Authority10
Marketing Policy10
Marketing Budget12
Appendixes14
Abbreviations19
References19

Executive Summary

High tuition fees, escalating costs, shifting demography, expanding choices, the value proposition and other numerous external factors can potentially damage, or even deplete, the new student prospect pool, so schools must pay more attention than ever before to marketing concerns. While many equate marketing with advertising and promotion, making the most of external initiatives begins with a cohesive and collaborative internal effort. The power of partnerships among key internal stakeholders, including faculty, admissions, development and finance staff must be recognized. Integrating departmental functions is not only good leadership and management. By listening carefully to those you seek to serve, making sure all stakeholders understand their roles, and putting the right technology infrastructure in place to support communication, a school can foster strong internal collaboration that helps to advance their missions. This is a strategic marketing plan developed to where I work, Alethea School which seek prosperity in near future.

Situation Analysis
Market Characteristics
Education of Sri Lanka plays a major role in the life style and the culture of Sri Lanka and evidence can be seen from as far as from 300 BC. It is a fundamental right in the constitution of the country having a literacy rate of 92%. Education in the country is under the central government and provincial councils and provides knowledge in all 3 primary languages Sinhala, Tamil and English. A standard system of schools began in 1832 with Colebrook Commission. Modern school system is of 3 major categories, the Government schools which provides the education freely and functioning over 9000 schools all over the island, The 66 Private schools which follows the same curriculum set by the Ministry of education and the International schools which prepares students for the London Ordinary Level and Advanced Level examinations such as EDEXCEL, Cambridge and IB Diploma. The student base is children of age 2 ½ to 18.

Trends and Drivers
Free education plays a major role in the education system in Sri Lanka but insufficient government spending had declined the standards of education in the country. The resources are stagnated to a few schools and it had created a competition and an extremely high demand for those few schools in Colombo. Due to the high completive nature of national exams parents seek additional help at home and at group or mass classes to improve their children's grades and performance. In recent years this has become a lucrative enterprise Most urban Sri Lankans had admitted their children into International schools and paying or willing to pay large sums in order to give quality education to their children in English medium because fluency in English had become a vital factor in the job market and in the higher education. Legal, Political and Economic factors

Sri Lankan education had mainly being influenced by the political trends of the country. The government is now promoting the private universities to work in collaboration with the local universities. The household income per month is increased to an average amount of Rs.26,471 ($238.52) in 2005 in the Western province and they are spending the highest amount for education. Alethea...
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