Robert Frost

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RoFrost suffered from depression and at one time considered suicide. This can be seen in his poem Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening. The poem is a metaphor of his life. Halting the sledge by some woods the last stanza says it all. The woods are lovely dark and deep

But I have promises to keep
And miles to go before I sleep.
The woods are death, which Frost would love to melt into an find his one night's sleep without dreams but he has promises to keep and to fulfil them he has a long way to go before he finds peace (death).

Frost was born in San Francisco. His father was a teacher and an editor – when Frost senior died Frost came under the influence of his grandfather who was an overseer at a New England mill. Frost grew up in the city although his poems reflect rural life. He did various mundane jobs, which he didn’t enjoy and escaped from that kind of life when his poems were recognised and he became one of America’s best known poets. It would appear that Frost’s upbringing in the city did not stop him from writing about the great ideas.

Frost and politics
Frost was a right-winger who even looked upon President Roosevelt as a socialist!!! However, when he visited the USSR in 1962 and met Nikita Krushchev he felt drawn to Krushchev. Yet Krushchev had no delusions about what sort of country Frost lived in nor how Frost’s politics were so far to the right they were falling of the edge of the planet. Krushchev like Marx found it impossible to see that capitalism could ever change its spots saying, ‘A black frog cannot be whitewashed.’ On the inevitable decay of Western capitalism he said, ‘If you cannot hold on by the mane, you will not be able to hold on by the tail.’ Like many people who had first hand knowledge of living inside a capitalist state he felt that its collapse was inevitable and after 1980 Krushchev’s intuition was proved correct as capitalism became increasingly irrelevant to millions of ordinary families. * 1 year ago

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bert Frost Robert Frost’s Poetic Style
The most of American of poets, Robert Frost was recognized not in his own country, but abroad, and his first two books were published in England. He never entered a competition and did not believe in prize contests yet the Pulitzer Prize for the best poetry of the year was awarded to him for four times. President Kennedy called Robert Frost, “The great American poet of our time” and described him thus. “His life and his art summed up the essential qualities of the New England, he loved so much: the fresh delight in Nature, the plainness of speech, the canny wisdom, and deep underlying insight into the human soul.” Aldlai Stevenson paid him the following tribute: “In Robert Frost, the American people have found their poet, their singer, their seer—–in short their bard.” Robert Frost As A Regional Poet

Robert Frost was always a regional poet, and his region was New England, more practically New Hampshire which he considered one of two best states in the USA, the other being Vermont. He never felt slightest desire to include all America within the scope of his poetry. But at the same time, he never tried to bring his characters into regional unity and did not dream of Utopia for them. As John Lynen says, “Frost is the best known to the public as the poet of New England. Like Faulkner, he stands forth as both the interpreter and the representative of his regional culture.” The New England provides him with stories, attitudes, characters, which are appropriate to his needs. He falls in love with New England tradition and it gives him strength. The literary tradition into which his work broadly fits is a pastoral one. His subjects are usually characters, events or creatures of rural New England. He deals with the commonplaces of the countryside——-Apple Picking, Hey-Making, Sleep of an Old Man Alone in an Old Farm House, Cleaning Of Pasture, Springs, interpreting a universal touch to his...
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