Pride and Prejudice V Bride and Prejudice

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The way of life in this modern society has developed itself over hundreds of years. Still, however changed, the values of today's society remain from the period of Regency England. Regency England, being the super power of the world in the 18th century, imposed the morals and ethics upon the world as they did their own country, where people were expected to abide by. Jane Austen illustrates the values of this prejudiced society through Pride and Prejudice, which involved the role of women as a major, governing over their marriages for economic sustainability and their lack of authority. Austen's controversial novel was adapted into a feature film which presented the real and gritty society as how it truly was during the time of Regency England; before the adaptation was released, Austen's work was paralleled in 20th century India as the transformation, Bride and Prejudice. These films realise for their audience the significance of Regency England to the forming of modern society's own values, and how it became the foundation of such principles with their own being the role of women.

In the late 18th century England, women were demoted to secondary roles in society with respect to property and social responsibilities through the many laws and morals binding women's rights. Rather than being capable of owning property, women were subjected with the role of marrying for economic sustainability. By remaining true to the novel, Pride and Prejudice (film) supported this view throughout the film during the scenes such as immediately after Elizabeth Bennet, the heroine of this romantic comedy, flatly refuses the awkward marriage proposal offered by Mr. Collins, stating fiercely that "[he] could not make [her] happy, and [she is] the last woman in the world who could make [him] happy". Soon after Elizabeth's rejection, her best friend, Charlotte, arrives with the news that "Mr Collins and [she] are... engaged." Pathetic fallacy is employed to portray the dreaded effect...
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