Mr. Collins Idiocy in Pride and Prejudice

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 266
  • Published : June 6, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview
Pride and Prejudice reflect the strictly regimented nature of life for the middle and upper classes in Regency England. Jane Austen satirizes this kind of class-consciousness, particularly in the character of Mr. Collins, who though Mr. Collins offers an extreme example, he is not the one to hold such view. His conception of the importance class is shared, among other by Mr. Darcy who believes in the dignity of his lineage. The social interactions at the ball provide the reader with a picture of the formalities of early 19th century English society and the extreme importance which rank and wealth played in social relations. Mr. Collins wants to introduce himself to Mr. Darcy because he is Lady Catherine's nephew, his duty and he had to follow the order of his conscience. Elizabeth doesn't want Collins introduce himself to Darcy because she thought that it must belong to Mr. Darcy to begin the acquaintance. She tried hard to prevent him assuring him that Mr. Darcy would consider his addressing him without introduction as an impertinent freedom, rather than a compliment to his aunt; that it was not in the least necessary there should be notice on either side. After all of her warns to him, he insists on does it. He introduce himself rudely and Mr. Darcy was eyeing was unrestrained wonder and his contempt seemed abundantly. Mr. Collins' behavior hurt Elizabeth feeling and pride, her prejudice is seems fake. His behavior refers to his narrow minded and how he is ridiculous person. In this moment Elizabeth understood Darcy's behavior against idiot people and she advised Mr. Collins, but he didn't listen. Elizabeth family put her in critical situation and she was agonies. All of the circumstance of this party makes her feel that her family made an agreement to expose them as much as they could during the...
tracking img