Physics Spring Lab

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Raw Data:

Number of Washers | 4 | 6 | 8 | 10 | 12 | Mass of Washers (kg) (+/- .0005 kg) | 0.0265 | 0.0393 | 0.0522 | 0.6260 | | Mass of Stopper (kg) (+/- .0005 kg) | 0.0040 | 0.0040 | 0.0040 | 0.0037 | 0.0037 | Radius of String (m) (+/- .05 mm) | 0.5300 | 0.5150 | 0.5800 | 0.5840 | 0.5530 | Time for 20 Revolutions (s) (+/- .0005 s) | 10.0300 | 8.2650 | 7.7200 | 7.0800 | 6.6700 |

Processing Raw Data:

Conclusion:

It is hypothesized that the tension found in the string based on the mass of the washers would be equal to the tension derived from the formula for centripetal force, because it is the same string and therefore the same tension. Our findings supported this as the centripetal force formula gave us a tension that is very close to the tension found through the mass of the washers when you account for errors in measuring. The forces must have been equal, or the washers would have accelerated in either direction. As more washers were added the amount of time needed to complete twenty revolutions decreased fairly steadily as the tension increased. This was expected because the more washers you have the higher the tension will be, and the higher the velocity must be as so that the centripetal force and the force of gravity are equal. (Since velocity is distance divided by time the time needed to decrease for the velocity to increase.) Overall, accounting for the minute errors that occurred throughout the procedure, the expected results were attained. The tension produced by hanging a mass from a string was measured as being roughly equal to the tension produced from the centripetal acceleration of a stopper attached to the same string.

Evaluating Procedures:
The collected data was sufficient to address the research question and validate the hypothesis, however, the procedures were capable of giving slightly more accurate...
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