Persuasive Paper

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Cognitive Behavior
Developing a Psychology Perspective
Capella University

Cognitive Behavior
There are so many different forms of depression, even with the different diagnoses some of the symptoms are similar and at times the very same. Trying to decide whether or not the cognitive perspective outweighed the biological perspective was unfair because both are equally important with both causing depression. The following is a glossary of depression terms borrowed from WebMD: Antidepressant. A drug used to treat depression. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are one common class. It includes drugs like Celexa (citalopram), Lexapro (escitalopram), Paxil (paroxetine), Prozac (fluoxetine), and Zoloft (sertraline.) Anxiety disorder. A chronic condition that causes anxiety so severe it interferes with your life. Some people with depression also have overlapping anxiety disorders. Bipolar disorder. A type of depression that causes sometimes extreme mood swings between depression and mania (or hypomania.) This condition used to be called manic depression. Dysthymia. A type of chronic depression that is less severe than major depression. It can also last for years. Dysthymia may not disable a person, but it prevents one from functioning normally or feeling well. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). A treatment for depression that uses electric current to create a brief, controlled seizure. It is safe and often effective for depression that hasn't responded to drugs or therapy. Hypomania. A milder form of mania.

Major depression. The medical diagnosis for depression that lasts for at least two weeks and interferes with daily life. It causes symptoms like low energy, fatigue, and feelings of hopelessness. Mania. A symptom of bipolar disorder, mania is a period of intense happiness, irritability, or recklessness. It is so extreme that it interferes with a person's life. Mood stabilizers. A class of drugs used to treat some types of depression, like bipolar disorder. They include lithium and some drugs originally used for seizures called anticonvulsants. Neurotransmitter. A chemical in the brain, like serotonin or norepinephrine, that sends messages between brain cells. Medicines that treat depression often alter the levels of these chemicals. Panic attack. A sudden feeling of intense fear or anxiety, accompanied by physical symptoms, that isn't triggered by real danger. Panic attacks are common in many anxiety disorders. Postpartum depression. Depression that affects women who have recently given birth. Many new mothers experience a brief episode of mild mood changes known as the "baby blues," but some will suffer from postpartum depression, a much more serious condition that requires active treatment and emotional support for the new mother. Psychotherapy. A way of treating a mental or emotional disorder by talking with a therapist. It may also be called "talking therapy" or "talk therapy." Psychologist. A professional who specializes in the treatment of mental or emotional disorders. Psychologists typically use psychotherapy to treat people with depression and other conditions. Psychiatrist. A medical doctor who specializes in treating psychological disorders. Since psychiatrists are doctors, they can prescribe drugs like antidepressants. Some also use psychotherapy. Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) Depression that occurs seasonally, usually starting in fall or winter and ending in spring or early summer. It is often treated with phototherapy, which is regular exposure to special lights.

This is a topic that has researchers and other professionals conducting a wide variety of studies, experiments, testing, etc. to uncover the root of depression. It's fascinating to have a large population of people suffer with/from depression and there is no concrete answer(s) as to why this mind state occurs. I've read a few articles...
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