Paradise Lost

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Paradise Lost

In the epic poem, Paradise Lost by John Milton, he uses the theme of jealousy. Milton uses many examples of this theme throughout the poem. He uses Satan’s jealousy of God’s power, Heaven, and Adam and Eve as examples of the theme of jealousy.

Satan’s jealousy of God is one way that Milton conveys this theme of jealousy in the epic poem. Milton describes how Satan is jealous of God’s position and wants to be equal to him. In book five, Raphael explains to Adam the jealousy Satan felt and why he was condemned from Heaven. The outcome of Satan’s jealousy is the start of the war between Heaven and Hell for three days and ultimately Satan being cast into Hell by the Son. Milton’s use of the theme of jealousy in this example reveals to readers that jealousy causes conflict, which results in a situation far more worse then you started with.

Satan’s jealousy of Heaven is another way that Milton conveys this theme of jealousy in Paradise Lost. Milton explains how Satan wants to make Hell into his own Heaven. In book three, when Satan goes to Heaven to spy on Adam and Eve he becomes jealous of the creation that has been made by God. The outcome of Satan’s jealousy of the creation of Heaven is that he decided to create his own Heaven by making Hell to mimic God’s world. Milton’s use of jealousy in this example shows readers how evil Satan is and how bad mimics good. Satan’s jealousy of mankind is the last way that Milton conveys this theme of jealousy in the epic poem. Milton describes how Satan is jealous of mankind and what God has created. In book four, Satan visits Heaven and views the creation of mankind. He becomes jealous and guilty of the humans and believes he could have once loved them but concludes that he is too evil. The outcome of Satan’s jealousy of the creation of mankind is that he convinces himself to corrupt mankind Adam and Eve. Milton’s use of jealousy in this example shows readers that...
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