Pak Us Relationship

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Recent Trends in Pak-US Relations

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Recent Trends in Pak-US Relations
Editor Dr Noor ul Haq Assistant Editor Muhammad Nawaz Khan

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IPRI Factfile 

 

C ONTENT
Preface 1. 2 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.  18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. The See-saw of Pak-US Relations Hillary Clinton’s Visit The Pak-US Relations After Bin Laden: The Future of the US-Pakistan Relationship The Way Forward Pakistan Did not Know about Osama: US Pakistan to Decide Whether We Can Take Joint Action: Munter US, Pakistan at Crossroads, Says US House Speaker Time to Press ‘Reset’ Button on Pak-US Ties: Kerry Myth & Reality of American Aid US Has ‘Set of Expectations’ from Islamabad: Hillary Pakistanis Want a Better Future, Just Like US Should (Could) America and Pakistan’s Bond Be Broken? Pakistan-US Security Relationship at Lowest Point since 2001, Officials Say Pakistan in the Danger Zone The State of Relations US Suspends $800m in Pakistan Military Aid US Withholding Military Aid to Pakistan Suspension of US Military Assistance US Policy in Pakistan is Immature Diplomacy – Journalist Obama's Drone Surge in Pakistan Doing more Damage than Good Going ‘Dutt’ against America Pakistan Chastised Going it Alone The Real Story Behind US-Pakistan Relations: An Alliance of Convenience Future of Ties with America Failure in Af-Pak: How the US Got it Wrong US, Pak Need Each Other: Haqqani Repairing Relations with the United States ISI Chief’s Visit Let’s Dump America No Invincible Position Abbottabad Fiasco: An Introspection Renewed Pak-US Cooperation US Short Term vs Pak Long Term Epicentre Hacking into Haqqanis? v 1 3 5 7 9 10 11 14 15 19 21 22 24 27 30 33 35 36 39 40 41 43 44 46 47 50 52 55 56 58 59 60 63 65 66 69

Recent Trends in Pak-US Relations

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  37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. Another Challenge to US-Pakistan Ties US Congress Sends Mixed Signals on Aid What Would Happen if Pakistan and the US Severed Ties? US Aid Bill Engaging Pakistan is in the Best Interest of India and US: Blake Khar to US: No Need for Cajoling on Militancy Where Do Pakistan and US Go from Here? Pak-US Military Ties at 'Very Difficult' Crossroads: Mullen Is this the Obama Doctrine? US-Pakistan Relations Pak-US Ties: Concerns and Prospects US Economy and Pakistan When the Yankees Go Home The Kidnapped American Visible and Invisible US Conditionalities US-Pakistan Ties

IPRI Publications

 

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IPRI Factfile 

 

P REFACE
Pakistan has always desired to be on good terms with the US. The father of the nation, Quaid-i-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah, while welcoming the first Ambassador of the United States of America on February 26, 1948 had described Pakistan and USA as equal partners in defence of democracy. He had said: Though Pakistan is a new State, for well over a century now there have been many connections of trade and commerce between the people of Pakistan and the people of the United States. This relationship was strengthened and made more direct and intimate during two World Wars and more particularly and more recently during the Second World War when our two people stood shoulder to shoulder in defence of democracy. The historic fight for selfgovernment by your people and its achievement by them, the consistent teaching and practice of democracy in your country had for generations acted as a beacon light and had in no small measure served to give inspiration to nations who like us were striving for independence and freedom from the shackles of foreign rule….1

Pakistan has been a strategic partner of the US during the Cold War and thereafter in the war against terrorism as a non-NATO ally. Pakistan has suffered more casualties than the combined losses of all countries operating in Afghanistan. The reason is that Afghanistan has the longest border with Pakistan, besides having...
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