One Green Apple

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Which parts of the text seem absolutely “obvious” or “natural” to you – so much a part of “the way things are” that you may have difficulty identifying them at all?  Since all literature constructs a version of reality, why do you think these ideas seem so convincingly realistic? Which of your own experiences, assumptions, or beliefs do you feel most strongly when you interact with this literature?  How can an awareness of your own culture background impact the way you read this text?

One Green Apple, by Eve Bunting, is a story that helps readers see the struggles of being a foreign student and adjusting to a different countries culture. The book was natural to me and I had no problem identifying with the texts underlined message. By relating to Farrah I understood how she felt being different because of her customs, such as wearing a dupatta. Growing up as a Jew I also had costumes that were obviously different than most of the students I went to school with. I was looked as being different and made fun of because I was not involved in Christmas holiday celebrations during the school year. Like Farah, I tried to focus on what things I did have in common with other students such as books and sports. I love how the book shows how Farah connected by relating the similarities that she shared with the other children. She observed that the kids laughed, sneezed and belched just like her. She also took note of how the dogs still romp and how hay still tickles the nose just as it did in the village she comes from. Soon she felt comfortable in her environment and a language barrier somewhat wasn’t there. This story is so convincingly realistic and almost everyone can relate because we all come from different walk of life and have experienced a situation like Farah’s of being different. I also really enjoyed how tasty the cider turned out for the students even though the apples were mixed together. This is an excellent metaphor of the benefits of intermingling...
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