Omam

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 76
  • Published : April 1, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Cohen 1

Prefiguring an Inevitable Ending

Of Mice and Men is a story that uses foreshadowing to hint at the events that represent the struggles of achieving the American dream, during the great depression. John Steinbeck does an incredible job of influencing how the reader analyses and reacts to the text. In nearly every sentence, he uses the technique to foreshadow the accidental killing of Curley’s wife, the incapability to reach the American dream, and the merciful death of Lennie. Foreshadowing causes the reader to predict, ask questions, and infer. This helps make the story easier to comprehend and overall it helps to create a great piece of literature that keeps the reader entertained, wanting to see how the story unfolds.

Steinbeck uses foreshadowing by giving small hints that make the reader predict and ask questions about possible upcoming events. An example of this is when the gun used to shoot Curley’s dog is the same one that George uses to kill Lennie. “He went to his bunk, pulled his bag from underneath and took out a Luger pistol. Lets get it over with, said Candy” (Steinbeck 47). As previously stated, this quote foreshadows to the end when George uses the same gun. Also, the dog they are killing is said to be useless and only makes everybody irritated because of its awful smell. This is foreshadowing to George’s decision of killing Lennie because he cannot deal with him anymore and he wanted to put him out of his future misery. In addition to using the same gun, Carlson kills the dog the exact same way George kills Lennie. In the text it says “He said apologetically to Candy, he won’t even feel it, right in the back of his old head” (Steinbeck 48). This foreshadows the scene where George kills Lennie because he clones the exact same notion of putting the gun to the back of his head, so he will not feel it. The author’s use of foreshadowing is almost ironic because each of these scenes are described in the exact same way, just in different...
tracking img