Offshore Oil Drilling

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Offshore Oil Drilling 1
The Time Has Come For More Offshore Oil Drilling
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Figure 1 shows what a typical offshore oil rig looks like. http://jonesact.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/oilrig.jpg

Bryce D. Cates
EPD 155 Sec 3
“Research Project”
April 15, 2010

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To: Paul Ross
From: Bryce D. Cates
Date: April 15, 2010
Subject: Cover Memo

What do we do to obtain oil to meet the needs of Americans without having to “sell out” to Middle Eastern countries, not only with money but with foreign policy? This paper intends to refute the claims of those opposing America’s attempts to address its own energy needs rather than rely on the oil sources of other countries. In many of his campaign speeches President Obama stated that we need to become less dependent on foreign oil and at the same time less dependent on oil all together. Many Americans would also agree with this. It has been known for years that everything is a “give and take” and that you can’t please everyone. Though none of these changes can occur over night, it is absolutely imperative that the changes do happen now or we will continue on our downward spiral of becoming more and more dependent on foreign oil production.

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Outline and TOC

1. Introduction and Movement Towards Offshore Drilling 2. Still Maintaining Our Natural Habitats
3. Proposed Drilling Sites
4. Bristol Bay
5. Gulf of Mexico
6. Oil and Natural Gas Reserves
7. Controlling Oil Costs
8. Oil Independence
9. Benefits of Oil Independence
10. Effects of Offshore Drilling

1. Introduction and Movement Towards More Offshore Drilling

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Figure 2 March 31,2010 President Obama unveils a plan to allow more offshore drilling http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/31/science/earth/31energy.html

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In 2009, President Obama made a major move in this direction by lifting the eighteen year old White House ban on offshore drilling. In March 2010, President Obama moved to allow drilling from Delaware to central Florida, plus the northern waters of Alaska, and exploration could begin 50 miles off the coast of Virginia by 2012. He also wants Congress to lift a drilling ban in the oil-rich eastern Gulf of Mexico, 125 miles from Florida beaches. The proposal would end a longstanding moratorium on oil exploration along the East Coast from the northern tip of Delaware to the central coast of Florida, covering 167 million acres of ocean. Under the plan, coastline from New Jersey northward would remain closed to all oil and gas activity.

2. Still Maintaining Our Natural Habitats

The environmentally sensitive Bristol Bay in southwestern Alaska would be protected and no drilling would be allowed under the plan, officials said. However, large tracts in the Chukchi Sea and Beaufort Sea in the Arctic Ocean north of Alaska (nearly 130 million acres) would be eligible for exploration and drilling after extensive studies. The Obama administration is proposing to open vast expanses of water along the Atlantic coastline, the eastern Gulf of Mexico and the north coast of Alaska to and natural gas drilling, much of it for the first time (Kahn, 2010).

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3. Proposed Drilling Sites

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Figure 2 The proposed sites for the new offshore drilling
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/31/science/earth/31energy.html

The proposal is a compromise that will please oil companies and domestic drilling advocates, but may anger some residents of affected states and many environmental organizations. However, would end a longstanding moratorium on oil exploration along the East Coast from the northern tip of Delaware to the central coast of Florida, covering 167 million acres of ocean. Under the plan,...
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