Obrien Essay (1984)

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O'Brien is a character that the reader never really understands completely. Early in the book, Winston notices O'Brien, and believes that he has the same level of abhorrence and hate towards the Party by noticing what he looks like and acts like during certain times. This led Winston to believe that O'Brien could potentially be a friend or a co-conspirator in the fight against Big Brother. Later in the book however, Winston begins to realize that O'Brien is not his friend at all, but actually a member of the Inner Party. Members of the high ranked Inner Party know the "truth", which is ironically all built on lies. O'Brien helps carry out these lies by convincing Winston to fully believe in Big Brother, which destroy's Winston by the end of the novel. O'Brien's ethics, motivations, and behaviour towards others is questionable throughout the novel.

O'Brien is a large, burly man in his forties, with a very thick neck and rough face. He wears black overalls, which tells us he is a member of the Inner Party. Winston first notices O'Brien at one of the Two Minute Hate. While everyone around them is angrily shouting at the large screen of enemy Emmanuelle Goldstein, neither Winston nor O'Brien act fiercely. They eventually make eye contact. This is the first time that Winston realizes there may be other sane people living in this insane world with him, thinking the same things he is. He immediately wants to learn more about O'Brien and possibly become friends with him, secretly of course. What Winston doesn't know, however, is that O'Brien plans on tricking him into believing that he is a member of an Anti-Party called the "Brotherhood." When the two eventually contact each other, O'Brien gives Winston the address of his apartment, where he has a copy of Emmanuelle Goldstein's book. O'Brien tells Winston that he can come by to have a look at it. We learn later in the novel that O'Brien had actually helped write Emmanuel Goldstein's book, which acknowledges the fact...
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