Nfc Near Feild Communication

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  • Topic: Near Field Communication, RFID, Mobile phone
  • Pages : 13 (2428 words )
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  • Published : April 17, 2013
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Near Field Communication(NFC):
The Future Mobile Money Service

ABSTRACT :
In this paper, we explore new ways in
which Near Field Communication (NFC)
can be used on smart phones. NFC allows
for contextual application invocation
(CAI)— the execution of code on the
phone as a result of our environment . We
can launch applications because of
contextual information we learn from
another transaction on our phone, or we
can associate context with a virtual token
to recall at a later time. We can also pass
context from one phone to another so the
devices can interact in a multi-party
session. This paper presents a number of
compelling applications using CAI and a
ddresses the associated security and
usability concerns.

In the launch and the demos of Nexus S
smartphone (manufactured by Samsung)
by Google, NFC was defined as a
technology that allows two active devices
embedded with chips transmit small
pieces of data between each other when
they are in close proximity of 1cm-4cm
via short range wireless connection and at
low speeds of 106-414 kbps, depending
on the configurations. It is a low friction
setup because of the close range that two
NFC enabled devices can setup a
connection.

Remember RFID (Radio Frequency
Identification)? That started it all, and it's
been around the world since the 1990s.
RFID microchips are installed in reader
tags that can be found in a number of
everyday items, they're found in
supermarkets, supply chain equipment,
INTRODUCTION :
luggage tags, and even ― “smart” ID
Near Field Communication more
badges. There's a RFID chip installed on
commonly known as NFC, a brainchild of credit card that, when tapped on the point Sony and NXP semi conductors, is at the of sale, will complete your purchase bottom of the wireless totem pole (Brad without needing to go the ― “oldMolen, 2011) fashioned” route. Since NFC is based on

the same technology, it‘s easy to mistake
it for RFID. It takes the same type of chips
and bumps it up a notch by adding
computing power.
That‘s why putting it on a phone is so
critical; NFC not only needs the proper
hardware (an antenna and controller) but
the right software (OS platform that
support the apps) as well (Brad Molen,
2011).

Near Field Communication(NFC):
The Future Mobile Money Service
History: A summarized history of

General Electric .

1980-1990
RFID, NFC‘s Parent Technology as
presented by Omosola O., Nadja R. and
Mainstream commercial RFID
Ievirt G III of the Faculty of Computer applications, especially in transportation Science at Stanford University.
and tolls, animal tagging, and
personal access.
1940-1950
1987: Norway tests RFID toll
World War II: Secret development of
collection.
practical radar by the several nations
1989: Dallas North Turnpike and the
1940: Term RADAR coined by the US
Lincoln Tunnel (between New York and
Navy (Radio detection and ranging)
New Jersey) test RFID toll collection.
1948: Invention of RFID by Harry
Stockman in his paper, Communication by 1990-2000
Means of Reflected Power, Stockmans
Standardization by the International
vision was before its time ―before the
Organization for Standardization (ISO)
invention of the transistor (1950s), the
RFID widely deployed.
integrated circuit (late 1950s), and the
1991: first open highway electronic
microprocessor (1970s)
tolling system opens in Oklahoma.
1950-1960
Research and Development (R&D)
exploration of RFID technology
1960-1970
Development of RFID theory.
Emergence of RFID applications.
Late 1960s: first and most widespread
use of RFID by the Electronic Article
Surveillance (EAS), which was used to
prevent shoplifting or book theft from the
library

2003-2004

NFC became an acceptable standard for
the International Organization for
Standardization (ISO).
NFC became an accepted Information
Communication Technology and
Consumer Electronics (ECMA) standard.
The NFC Forum is created by...
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