Next Generation Network Evolution

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Network theory, Social network, Network science
  • Pages : 62 (18513 words )
  • Download(s) : 45
  • Published : May 1, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Next Generation Network Evaluation
June 2010

Produced by: Innovations for Scaling Impact and Keystone Accountability With generous support from the International Development Research Center and the Packard Foundation

For questions and/or comments on this paper please contact Catrina Lucero at clucero@scalingimpact.net

Table of Contents

PURPOSE INTRODUCTION AND CONTEXT THE CURRENT FIELD NETWORK METRICS NETWORK TOOLS GAPS IN CURRENT PRACTICE NETWORK THEORIES OF CHANGE NETWORKS AS COMPLICATED AND COMPLEX INITIATIVES CHALLENGES OF NETWORK MONITORING AND EVALUATION NETWORKS ARE COMPLICATED NETWORKS ARE COMPLEX NETWORK IPARL SYSTEMS ARTICULATING A NETWORK THEORY OF CHANGE EXPLICATING NETWORK MEMBERS’ THEORIES OF ACTION DEVELOPING AN INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT FRAMEWORK DEVELOPING STAKEHOLDER, PUBLIC AND DONOR REPORTING PROCESSES CONTINUOUS LEARNING AND IMPROVEMENT MECHANISMS IMPLEMENTING AN IPARL SYSTEM THROUGH THE NETWORK LIFE CYCLE CATALYZING LAUNCHING ENHANCING AND EXPANDING TRANSFORMING CHALLENGES OF NETWORK IPARL NETWORK IPARL CASES THE GLOBAL KNOWLEDGE PARTNERSHIP THE GLOBAL PARTNERSHIP FOR THE PREVENTION OF ARMED CONFLICT THE GLOBAL AIDS ALLIANCE AND ITS CAMPAIGN TO END PEDIATRIC HIV/AIDS REFERENCES

3 3 4 4 13 24 24 26 28 28 29 31 31 32 32 33 34 34 35 35 35 36 34 37 39 42 48

For questions and/or comments on this paper please contact Catrina Lucero at clucero@scalingimpact.net

2

Purpose This paper reviews the current field of network monitoring and evaluation with the goal of identifying where progress has been made and where further work is still needed. It proposes a framework for network impacts planning, assessment, reporting and learning that can help to close some of the current gaps in network evaluation while building on the advances that have been made. This document is written for practitioners undertaking network evaluation and foundation program staff working to support networks. Introduction and Context Networking and networks have become increasingly and consciously utilized as organizing strategies and structures for creating social change in this world.1 The growing realization that no single actor, no matter how effective they are, is capable of tackling today’s social problems has spurred a flurry of international interest and investment in networks from a wide range of actors and sources. The World Bank began funding networks through its Global and Regional Partnership Program in the mid-1990’s and is now currently supporting approximately 175 partnership programs, having spent $3.5 billion in 2006 alone.2 The Climate Works Foundation has organized more than ten funders and organizations from across sectors and geographies as part of a billion dollar coordinated campaign to fight climate change.3 The Global AIDS Alliance has launched an advocacy network across six African countries in a Campaign to End Pediatric HIV/AIDS.4 Grant makers like the Ford Foundation5, Anne E. Casey Foundation6, MacArthur Foundation7 and many others have made the funding of networks a key part of their portfolio and grant making strategy. At the same time, the growing demand for more success from social change public and private initiatives has created an explosion of interest in and demand for increased and improved monitoring and evaluation and impact evaluation. Governments, donors and practitioners are all feeling pressure to demonstrate and report on the impact of their work. Together, these two trends have created a growing appetite for the monitoring and evaluation and impact evaluation of networks. An increasing number of methods, tools and metrics have been proposed, developed and piloted in response to this demand. While important steps have been taken, the field of network monitoring and evaluation is still, in theory and even more so in practice, in its infancy.

MonitorMonitorMonitorMonitorMonitorMonitor1 2

Wilson-Grau and Nuñez 2006....
tracking img