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Multisensory Learning Theory

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Multisensory Learning Theory

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  • July 2010
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Running Head: Multisensory Learning

Multisensory Learning
Cindy Price
EDA
University of Phoenix
June 27, 2010

When people enter the educational world, their primary goals should be student achievement and creating an environment that their students are successful in. Some of the important factors in the creation of the most effective environment are the method of teaching, their personal educational philosophy and the learning theory that brings these factors together. There are several learning theories and theorists that we as educators learn about as we go through our studies and they vary from Constructivists to Multiple Intelligences to Multisensory. As we progress in the world of education, these learning theories are constantly changing in importance depending on the government, expectations and the type of curriculum we are focusing on. One thing we have seen is that over the years we go in a complete circle. Former curricular methods and theories are eventually revisited and put back in the forefront.

One of the learning theories that has been visited several times is the Multisensory Learning theory. Elliot Eisner has provided us with a hands on cross curricular solution. As cited in Knowles and Cole, (2008), Eisner, being a strong advocate of the arts believes that the arts are invaluable in the classroom. He has shown us that through art, students are able to experience the concepts and skills taught through the use of all of their senses. As a result of this, the lesson becomes more meaningful and is one that they will always remember. Not only are the arts important for the students, he goes even further and explains the importance the arts and the six forms of qualitative thinking has on the entire world of education. Eisner has compiled a list of ten lessons that the arts teach. The use of art teaches “children to make good judgments” ( Eisner, 2005). Although, the correct answer is what the curriculum is geared towards;...