Mobile Phone and Literary Skills

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A Study on the Effects of Text Messaging to the Literary Skills of the High School Students in Lyceum of Cebu School Year 2012-2013

Researchers:

Table of Contents
Chapter 1
I. Introduction
* Rationale of the study
* Theoretical Background
* Theoretical Framework
II. The Problem
* Statement of the Problem
* Significance of the study
* Scope and Limitations of the Study
* Definition of terms
Chapter 2
III. Related Literature and Studies
* Related Literature
* Related Studies
Chapter 3
IV. Research Methodologies and Procedures
* Research Method
* Research Environment
* Research Respondents
* Research Instruments
* Research Procedures
* Statistical Instruments
Chapter 4
V. Interpretation of Analysis and Data
VI. Conclusion
VII. Bibliography

Chapter 1
Introduction
Rationale
Millions of ludicrous emails are surfacing on the web, sent from students and job seekers to professionals, using made-up words like "i" and "come2u." It may not be the fault of schools, friends or even television, but because of the vastly popular communication craze, text messaging. Text messaging, even more so than emails, uses choppy lingo and sloppy spelling to get a quick and short message across. While teachers and professionals are pulling out their hair trying to figure out why text message spelling has become mainstream, not all studies about the phenomena are telling people to worry. People's abilities to write and speak English properly may still be safe, or even bettered by text messaging, as long they know when to leave it on their cellphones.

The mainstream media claims that the short hand and abbreviated characteristics of text messaging are making children lazy, not forcing them to use the proper grammar and spelling that they learn in school. The resulting opinion is that text messaging is to blame for low literacy rates of students. Yet as more scholarly researcher is done on text messaging as well as other digital literacies such as IM, emails, and blogs, they are discovering that the public opinion and mainstream media reports are not in line with the true interactions of children with new technologies and how it is changing the face of literacy.

What are some of the effects that texting is having on our society? That is the question that our group explores in this paper. We conducted surveys and took a look at articles, looking to find some of the effects that the modern day texting phenomenon is causing. We examined the impacts that texting is making on our language and writing skills. Theoretical Background

With the revolutionary new forms of communication that technology has introduced comes a debate on what effect these new digital mediums have on literacy. Text messaging is quickly becoming a primary form of communication for many people around the world, yet the research behind the rhetorical situation of text messaging is very limited. Text messaging or "texting" was only developed and released to the public in the mid-1990s. By 2009, 60 percent of the world's population already had access to a cellphone, and texting was the second most common way to use the technology to communicate, after speaking person-to-person. Studies about how text messaging affect reading and writing began emerging in the early 2000s. It was obvious that with an almost universal limit of 160 characters and a tiny, awkward keyboard that was usually QWERTY-based, the majority of text message users would likely sacrifice correct use of language for speed. The media tends to take a binary approach to new technologies, stating that they are either completely or good or completely bad for the future of our society. They see text messaging as a breakdown of the literacy of the youth. Journalist John Sutherland has been quoted as saying that text messaging is thin and unimaginative…mask[ing] dyslexia, poor spelling and mental laziness and...
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