Maritime Transport

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Maritime Transportation
Intermodal Transportation

Content PagePage
1 Introduction to Maritime Transport2
2 Intermodal Transportation2
3 Transmodal Transportation2
4 Comparison between Intermodal and Multimodal Transportation2 5 Intermodal Transport Cost3
6 Containerization3
7 Disadvantages of Containerization3
8 Advantages of Containerization4
9 Reference List5

1. Introduction to Maritime Transport
Maritime Transportation has been around since 3,200BC and it is one of the commonly used modes of transportation. A total of 71% of all freights shipped globally are being transported by ships which are also equivalent to the earth’s water surface. There are several characteristics which define maritime transportation; space, geographical, physical attributes, control and its usage. Maritime Transportation operates on its own space and do not require any other support. This means aircrafts and trucks on land cannot use the space of the ocean to transport their cargo to the required destination. In addition, it can travel from one continent to another at any point of time from North, South, East or West, strategic by its control and also carry large quantities of cargo. For example, a bulk carrier is able to carry 400,000 metric tons of dead weight across miles of ocean. There are two types of transportation in maritime; intermodal and multimodal transportation. 2. Intermodal Transportation

Intermodal transportation is the competition among the various transportation modes such as land, sea and air. Also, it is the usage of at least two different modes from point of origin to destination. For example; when a container needs to be transported to a terminal, trucks need to carry the containers to the rail yard or directly to the ship for shipment where it will then be hauled to their respective destinations for discharging. 3. Transmodal Transportation

Transmodal transportation is the movement of passengers and cargoes within the same mode of transportation. For instance, passengers and cargoes are able to travel together in a ferry to the same destination. However, this mode of transportation is rarely used due to the time consuming of loading and unloading of cargoes which results to the passengers having to be hold-up for several hours. There are two perspective of intermodal transportation networks; Intermodal Transportation Network and Multimodal Transportation Network. Intermodal transportation network can be illustrated as a linked system using two or more transportation modes connecting from the place of origin to the end destination with a single rate paid to one bill of lading whereas multimodal transportation is a set of transportation modes offering connections between the places of origin to the end destination bearing all costs. 4. Comparison between Intermodal and Multimodal Transportation Intermodal transportation is preferred to multimodal transportation by clients due to a handful advantages. Firstly, customers are drawn to the time and cost minimization. Customers need to only obtain a one through payment with the shortest time required. This is convenient for many clients who are meticulous about time and cost as point of interchange is not required. Secondly, this mode of transportation is environmentally friendly due to the minimal usage of transportation which also denotes less air pollution. Today, the public are concern about the eco-system and are doing their part to save the environment motivating customers to make decisions which enables them to protect the Gaia. Therefore, this is highly beneficial for the intermodal transportation. In comparison, multimodal transportation time and cost are high. The time and cost spent to interchange at ports and the various ways of transporting the particular freight are expensive. Moreover, the use of the different types of...
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