malaysia educational development

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EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT:
EDUCATION AND HUMAN RESOURCES

A Case Study
Presented to
Dr. Theresita V. Atienza

In Partial Fulfillment
Of the Requirements in
MEM 652

SUBMITTED BY:
ROSETTE S. DELA CRUZ
LEA G. SOMOSO
JUNE 1, 2014

I. CASE BACKGROUND
The school in many underdeveloped countries is a reflection and a fruit of the surrounding underdevelopment, from which arises its deficiency, its quantitative and qualitative poverty. But little by little, and there lies the really serious risk, the school in these underdeveloped countries risks becoming in turn a factor of underdevelopment. Richard Jolly, Deputy Director General, UNICEF said “Investing in people, if done right . . . provides the firmest foundation for lasting development.” The human resource management system in any organization, given the constantly changing and dynamic environment, cannot be a static and fixed phenomenon. Strategic human resource management could serve the organizations in acquiring the competitive advantages. Under the strategic human resource framework, organizations are able to optimize their utilization of opportunities. Strategic management of the human resources brings the necessary coordination between various activities of an organization; moreover, it helps in creating appropriate opportunities and preventing the potential threats. Strategic integration is an inevitable necessity in creating consistency between human resource strategy and organizational strategy. Therefore, the ultimate purpose of developing the strategic integration is to generate a harmonic relationship between the goals of HRM and the organizational objectives. Today, firms believe that the system of internally coherent HR practices associated with organizational strategies, rather than separate HR plans being practiced in isolation, may boost organizational performance and productivity. Education in Malaysia is overseen by one government ministry. The Ministry of Education (Kementerion Pendidekan Malaysia) handles matters pertaining to pre-school, primary school, secondary school, post-secondary school and tertiary education. Although education is the responsibility of the federal government, each state has an education department to coordinate educational matters in its territory. The main legislative governing education is the Education Act of 1996. The Education may be obtained from the multilingual public school system which provides free education for all Malaysian or private, or even home schooling. Primary education is compulsory. Standardized test is a common feature. Currently, there are about 37 private universities, 20 private university colleges, 7 foreign university and 414 private colleges. The ratio of enrollees to teachers is 13:1.

II. PROBLEM STATEMENT
Most economists would probably agree that it is the human resources of a nation, not its capital or its natural resources, that ultimately determine the character and pace of its economic and social development. For example, according to the late Professor Frederick Harrison of Princeton University, “Human resources . . . constitute the ultimate basis for the wealth of nations. Capital and natural resources are passive factors of production; human beings are the active agents who accumulate capital, exploit natural resources, build social, economic and political organizations, and carry forward national development. Clearly, a country which is unable to develop, the skills and knowledge of its people and to utilize them effectively in the national economy will be unable to develop anything else.” The principal institutional mechanism for developing human skills and knowledge is the formal educational system. Most Third World nations have been led to believe or have wanted to believe that the rapid quantitative expansion of educational opportunities is the key to national development: The more education, the more rapid the development. All...
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