Machine That Changed the World Review

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Lean Production / Lean Manufacturing| "The Machine that changed..."

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Lean Production / Lean Manufacturing | "The Machine that changed..." Lean Production Lean Production - TOC Introduction What is "Lean" "The Machine that changed the World" Lean Thinking Womack Video 1 & 2 "Lean Into the Future" Lean Enterprise Model Womack Video 3, 4 & 5 Readings and Links Manufacturing Resources Manufacturing Department Tutorials - Lean Production / Lean Manufacturing "The Machine that changed the World" DEFENSE SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT COLLEGE MANUFACTURING MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT TEACHING NOTE George Noyes, 1997 The Machine that Changed the World (Synopsis) This book was written by the three senior managers of the International Motor Vehicle Program. It was a program born out of an international conference to announce publication of their previous book, The Future of the Automobile, in which they examined the problems facing the world motor-vehicle industry in 1984. The authors concluded that the auto industries of North America and Western Europe were relying on techniques that had changed very little from Henry Ford's original mass production system and that those techniques were simply not competitive with the new set of ideas pioneered by Japanese companies. These three men decided the most constructive step they could take would be to undertake a detailed study of the new Japanese techniques, which they subsequently named "lean production", compared with older Western mass production techniques. In order to do this, they developed the International Motor Vehicle Program (IMVP) operating out of the new Center for Technology, Policy and Industrial Development at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1985). The charter of the center was to go beyond conventional research to explore creative mechanisms for industry-government-university interaction on an international basis in order to understand the fundamental forces of industrial change and improve the policy-making process in dealing with change. In studying the lean production process, the IMVP realized their success depended critically on thoroughness, expertise, a global outlook, independence, industry access and continuous feedback. They felt they had to examine the entire set of tasks necessary to manufacture a car or truck: market assessment, product design, detailed engineering, coordination of the supply chain, operation of individual factories, and sales and service of the finished product. This research was conducted by an international team of researchers in academia, but who had come from the world of industry from Japan, Europe, and America. They also included studies of supply systems in leading developing countries, including Korea, Taiwan and Mexico.

Funding for the $5 million project came from contributions from many car companies, components suppliers, and governments. Contributions from individual companies and governments were limited to 5% of the $5 million total, thereby eliminating national or regional pressures in the conclusions that were ultimately drawn. IMVP was given extensive access to motor vehicle companies across the world, from the factory floor to the executive suite. They were amazed by the spirit of professionalism that was exhibited by the entire industry and which moved managers in the worst facilities and weakest companies to share their problems frankly, and managers in the best plants and strongest companies to explain their secrets candidly.

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Lean Production / Lean Manufacturing| "The Machine that changed..."

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This book is the conclusion drawn, not by the entire program, but...
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