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Figurative language
Defining

Type of figurative
Examples of figurative language 4

Implications for teaching 3
Samples activities 3

“used in some way other than the main or usual meaning, to suggest a picture in the mind or make a comparison” (Longman Dictionary of English Language and Culture 1992: 475).

Metaphor

My love is a rose
Rose Love

Qualities of the rose
Beauty

Fragance
Softness

Carry over

Qualities of the love
Beauty Fragance Softness

Examples of the figurative language

Violence is the cancer of modern society
Violence Cancer

 A figurative extension of a common

meaning  An intrinsic part of the lexicon of the native speaker.  a build-vocabulary skill(to understand and generate figurative extension)

Jane's ego is very fragile and she is easily crushed, so you have to handle her with care  The metaphor is out of the

underlying The mind is a brittle object

The store, where a window was found to be smashed, is only a stone's throw from the county police headquarters Idiom

Could help to memorize

I have the rages that small animals have, being small, being animal. Written on me was a message, 'At your Service' like a book of paper matches. One by one we were taken out and struck. We come bearing supper, our heads on fire.

Figurative language is so far. He compares herself and her

aunts to a book of matches He use the comparison rage/Matches We can find in journals and literary text

Implications for teaching

The learner needs to

disconnect the connections in the utterance through a process of inference.

Comprehending that two things which do not normally collocate together are being compared or brought together; —Deducing which features of the one are salient in the comparison; —Reinterpreting how the meaning of the other is altered when these salient features are applied to it. ----

Figurative meanings range from those recorded in dictionaries as specific senses of a word or idioms, to those revealing an original or idiosyncratic use of language

Idiosyncrasy: Mode of behaviour of a specific group

Some values must

be assumpted

Colours
In English the colour green

has a relationship with nature and innocent To be green/

Lexical

Categorizing language according to metaphorical 'propositions'

Here are two sentences which begin with the same first word. Can you guess what the missing word is? Compare your ideas with those of your partner. is a smoke rais'd with the fume of sighs is feeling cold in the back of vans

Love

Aim
Sensitize learners with the way

in which we talk about love and relationships in English. From inventive metaphor to conventional

Providing literal definitions and asking students to generate 'figurative' meanings from them

Look at the following list of words. Can you match each word with the definition that best explains its meaning?

branch mountain torrent chasm peak wave trickle desert

a. a large area of sandy land that has very little water or plant life(desert) b. a large amount of water that flows or falls very quickly c. a very deep crack in rock, earth, or ice d. an extremely high hill that usually has steep sides e. the slow flowing of a liquid in very small amounts f. the pointed top part of a mountain g. the part of a tree that grows out from the trunk and gets leaves, buds, or flowers h. the raised moving part of water on the surface of the lake or sea

Aim
generate figurative

extensions for words describing geographical features

Listing the literal qualities in a word group in order to decode their figurative meanings in a text

Can you explain the meaning of the following words?

A lighthouse
 A supertanker Dented

To ram
A wreck

Aim
 TO DEAL WITH METAPHORS

Where can we find?
Humorous journalism,
Advertisements,

 Poetry,
Literary text...
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