Link Between Job Satisfaction and Job Performance

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Acknowledgement
This research project would not have been possible without the support of some people. I would like to acknowledge and thank my supervisor Dr. Michela Betta for her constant guidance and insightful comments and taking my tangential discussions in the most sporting and supporting manner. Besides, I would also like to thank Mr Parikshat Verma for his insights and the valuable discussions I had with him in regards to the topic. Finally, I would like to thank my wife for her patience and support during these trying circumstances.

Executive Summary
Job satisfaction and job performance have held a great interest for social psychologists for almost a century. The interest stems from the alleged relationship and interplay between these two elements. This research thesis attempts to find out the nature and magnitude of this relationship along with the impact of any influencing variables. Research for this report included a review of previous studies pertaining to the alleged relationship between the two main elements, in particular three studies by Brayfield and Crockett (1955), Iaffaldano and Muchinsky (1985) and by Judge et al (2001) have been covered. The major finding indicate that the strength, nature, direction and indeed the very existence of the relationship depends not on job satisfaction and job performance but on some other influencing variables (ex-situational constraints, culture, personality, commitment etc.) and any reading of this relationship needs to be read in the proper context with thorough understanding of these variables.

Table of Contents
1. Introduction
2. Research questions
3. Literature survey
4. Theoretical Background
5. Methodology
6. Methods
7. Aims and Objectives
8. Conclusion
9. References
10. Appendix

Introduction
Job satisfaction and job performance
Job satisfaction and job performance have always been very integral, albeit contentious issues pertaining to overall organisational success. According to Vandeveer & Menefee (2006) job satisfaction is a person’s attitude that includes factors such as promotions, pay, opportunity, and the work environment. According to Campbell et al (1993) Performance is what the organisation hires one to do and do well. Dehkordi et al (2011) posit that job satisfaction is an important factor in occupational success, which increases the performance/productivity of an employee in an organisation. Historically speaking job satisfaction and job performance have been deemed to have some sort of a relationship which has resulted in efforts by owners or management of an organisation to get the maximum out of the employees and swear by the maxim “a happy employee is a productive employee”. The classic study relating attitudes and performance in an industrial setting was conducted by Kornhauser and Sharp in 1930 (Brayfield and Crockett, 1955). This study can be considered the forbearer of all subsequent studies dealing with job satisfaction and performance. Since then these two elements and the relationship between them has been the subject of numerous studies, like the ones done by Brayfield and Crockett (1955); Locke (1970), Iaffaldano and Muchinsky (1985) and more recently by Judge et al (2001) with varying results. A point of concern in the job satisfaction-job performance studies has been the direction of the causality arrow (Robbins et al, 1998). Direction of the causality arrow implies that it is not clear whether performance induces job satisfaction or vice-versa or even perhaps that both job satisfaction and job performance are either completely independent of each other and if not are influenced by some other variables. This research explores the existing knowledge of the relationship between job satisfaction and job performance by performing a meta-analysis of the existing subject matter knowledge and would contribute to the existing knowledge by providing an analysis of prior studies that have...
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