Leader Follower Development

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  • Topic: Leadership, Jesus, Leadership development
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LEADER-FOLLOWER DEVELOPMENT PROCESSES

____________________

A Paper

Submitted to Dr. Ricketson

Luther Rice University

____________________

In partial fulfillment

of the requirements for the Course

LD514 Leader/Follower Development

____________________

By

Michael Farrington

KT 4320

August 13, 2012

OUTLINE

I. INTRODUCTION

II. LEADER/FOLLOWER RELATIONSHIP

III. LEADER-FOLLOWER DEVELOPMENT PROCESS – RICKETSON

IV. LEADER-FOLLOWER DEVELOPMENT PROCESS - MALPHURS

V. LEADER-FOLLOWER DEVELOPMENT PROCESS - CLINTON

VI. CONCLUSION

INTRODUCTION
Van Velsor and McCauley have defined leader development as the “expansion of a person’s capacity to be effective in leadership roles and processes.”[1] These researchers indicate that these roles and processes aid in setting direction, creating alignment and maintaining functional interaction within the leader follower contexts of people sharing common work.[2] This paper will attempt to find support for and conclude with Ricketson that the functional interaction between leader and follower is an intentional, interdependent, reciprocal, dynamic relational process that is oriented toward a mutually-oriented direction – following the will of God. Using this as a framework of analysis, this paper will also analyze the roles and processes which aid the follower-leader development processes or philosophies of Ricketson, Malphurs and Clinton.

LEADER-FOLLOWER RELATIONSHIP
This section addresses the importance of understanding the underpinnings of the leader-follower relationship. An understanding of this relationship is foundational for analyzing various leader-follower development processes. This section will present various leader and follower theories to support Ricketson’s assertion that the functional interaction between leader/follower is an intentional, interdependent, reciprocal, dynamic relational process[3] that is oriented towards a mutually-oriented direction – following the will of God. Rost asserts that in the postindustrial economy of the twenty-first century, leadership and followership must be redefined because of a more mutually-oriented direction, and an “inherent interdependence in a common process.”[4] Ireland and Hitt observe that in today’s competitive, global, knowledge-based economy, leadership is a relational process that is widely distributed among formal leaders and followers.[5] In his courageous follower model, Chaleff advances the idea that followers do not serve leaders; rather “both leaders and followers serve a common purpose, each from their own role.” [6] Both Rost’s “mutual interests” and Chaleff’s “common purpose” find agreement with the outward focus in Maroosis’ view of reciprocal following. He identifies that effective leaders and followers both respond to a calling outside themselves – the shared vision. As they “turn their attention ‘outward,’ both leadership and followership are competencies that work in tandem as a shared discipline of reciprocal response-abilities.”[7] Like these models, Ricketson’s Follower First philosophy addresses the role-engagement nature of the leader/follower relationship. The foundational premise is the Christian ideology that Jesus’ purpose, commands and teachings were all centered on being a follower of the directives – the will – of His heavenly Father.[8] The Follower First philosophy creates an atmosphere where each person, regardless of position or title, recognizes others as fellow followers ... Leaders think only of how to follow the Lord by serving and fulfilling their responsibilities ... Followers are also aware of their role and responsibility to support their leaders.[9]

As the noted followership experts agree, in a properly engaged leader/follower relationship, both leaders and followers are functioning reciprocally for the best impact...
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