Language Input and Learning in the Foreign Language Classroom

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Dissertation Research Project-
Language input and learning in the Foreign Language Classroom Abstract:
This article examines the differences between native and non-native English speaking teachers, in an Italian Primary school classroom. It uses recordings of four language classes and analyses the teachers’ lexical input, alongside the lexical output of the learners. It examines the types of interaction which take place, and the teachers’ use of the L1 comparing it to the second language acquisition theories of Krashen’s (1981) comprehensible input hypothesis, Long’s (1981) interaction hypothesis, and Swain’s (1985) comprehensible output hypothesis. It was found that the teachers differed in terms of the L2 proficiency, their use of pair and group work as well as their use of the L1. The input that the learners received was found to be comprehensible and incidents of interactional modifications also took place. The study ends with an evaluation of its limitations and highlights potential areas for future research, such as the need for a larger corpus of data reflecting the type of input young learners are exposed to in foreign language classrooms. Contents:

1. Introduction
2. Literature Review
2.1 Differences between NS and NNS Teachers
2.2 Second Language Acquisition Theories
2. 3 Research Hypothesis
3. Methodology
3.1 Subjects and Data
3.2 Treatment of the Data and Use of the VocabProfile
4. Results
4.1 The Teachers’ Lexical Input
4.2 The Learners’ Lexical Output
4. 3 The Use of Pair and Group Work and Interaction
4.4 The Use of Error Corrections
4. 5 The Teachers’ Use of the L1
5. Discussion
5.1 The Teachers’ Lexical Input
5.2 The Learners’ Lexical Output
5. 3 The Use of Pair and Group Work and Interaction
5.4 The Teachers’ Use of the L1
6. Conclusion and Limitations
7. Bibliography
8. Appendices
8. 1 Transcription Key
8. 2 The Teachers’ Transcripts- a. Transcription of NS Teacher Level 4
b. Transcription of NNS Teacher Level 4
c. Transcription of NS Teacher Level 3
d. Transcription of NNS Teacher Level 3
8. 3 The Learners’ Transcripts- a. Transcription of NS Teacher Level 4 Class
b. Transcription of NNS Teacher Level 4 Class
c. Transcription of NS Teacher Level 3 Class
d. Transcription of NNS Teacher Level 3 Class
8. 4 Audio recordings of the language classrooms-Recording 1 NNS Teacher’s Level 3 Class
Recording 2 NNS Teacher’s Level 4 Class
Recording 3 NS Teacher’s Level 3 Class
Recording 4 NS Teacher’s Level 4 Class

Dissertation Research Project-
Language Input and Learning in the Foreign Language Classroom 1. Introduction:
This project aims to investigate the types of language input and learning that are available to young learners in the foreign language classroom. This study will examine the differences between native speaking (NS) and non-native English speaking (NNS) teachers, regarding their language input, their interaction with the learners, their use of the L1 and their approaches to error correction. This study will also investigate the learners’ output in comparison to the input that they receive from the teacher and will see whether the data can be examined against well-known second language acquisition theories, such as Krashen’s (1981) comprehensible input hypothesis, Long’s (1981) interaction hypothesis and Swain’s (1981) output hypothesis. Medgyes (1994: 25) claims, ‘native and non-native English speaking teachers are two different species’, which emphasises the perceived differences between native and non-native speakers in the field of teaching English as a foreign language. He bases this assumption on perceived claims that NS and NNS teachers differ in the language classroom in terms of their language proficiency, their teaching behaviour and their approaches to error correction (see Medgyes 1994; Árva and Medgyes 2000 and Samimy and Brutt-Griffler 1999)....
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