Kraft Foods and Corporate Social Responsibility

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Global Challenges Individual Assignment: Kraft Foods and CSR.

2012
Global Challenges

Table of Contents
Table of Contents1
1.0Introduction2
2.0Application3
2.1Kraft Foods Inc.3
2.2PESTEL Analysis3
2.3SWOT Analysis5
2.4Porters Five Forces5
2.5Management at Kraft Foods Inc.6
3.0Corporate Social Responsibility6
3.1Impact of CSR on Kraft Foods Inc6
4.0Conclusion7
5.0Recommendations7
6.0References8

1.0 Introduction
Management is a term that is used and heard of every day and a role that is undertaken everywhere you go. It’s the ability to maintain and produce the best from a team or from a task, the activity of completing a task using the resources that are available and taking responsibility of the situation in hand. Even as individuals everyone participates in management in one form or another, whether it’s in a work environment or simply from the everyday running of life. In a business sense however, ‘management is the jobs within an organisation charged with running the organisation on behalf of the beneficial owner’ (Pg no 294, Martin, 2005). This report is going to examine the different principles and models of management, how it can be applied to individual companies and businesses and then go on further to examine Corporate Social Responsibility and how firms use this. ‘According to Mintzberg (1973) there are ten management roles, these are ‘Monitor, Disseminator, Spokesperson, Figurehead, Leader, Liaison, Entrepreneur, Disturbance handler, Resource allocator and Negotiator’. Mintzberg proposes that every manager’s role combines a number of roles, rather than ten individual roles.’ (Boddy, 2009) For example a CEO of a company could be a figurehead, a spokesperson, a leader as well as the negotiator; but he would assign the other roles to other specific managers or colleagues. Management involves a vast amount of planning as its sets out the direction of the work that needs to be done and the objectives that need to be achieved. According to Boddy (2011) ‘SMART acronym summarises criteria for assessing a set of goals’. This covers: Specific – Does the goal set specific targets?

Measurable – Ensure you can measure the progress towards the attainment of the goal Attainable – Assuring the goals are challenging but reachable Rewarded- A reward is obtained for succeeding the goal

Times – The time scale of which the goal is to be achieved in Boddy (2010) proposes that ‘’goals and objectives are the same’’. However in cases like this it could be argued that they are different in which the goal is the overall target or aim, and the plan which looks at what is involved to obtain this goal is made up of individual objectives at each level. A widely used management model used within virtually every company is the Competing Values Framework. ‘’It has been named as one of the fifty most important models in the history of business and has been studied and tested in organisations for more than twenty five years’’ (CVF, 2009). The model is made up of four components and each quadrant represents a different model and the roles that are played within the model; which can be seen in the diagram below in Figure 1.1. The following section will demonstrate how the framework can be applied to individual companies. Figure 1.1 Competing Values Framework. Source: Octogram.net (2005)

2.0 Application
3.1 Kraft Foods Inc.
Kraft Foods Inc. is the second largest food company in the world generating annual revenue of £54.4 billion. The company was founded in 1903 in Chicago, North America, where their headquarters are still based, and shares began trading on the New York Stock Exchange in 1991. They have over 126,000 employees in over 70 countries and they sell products to consumers in 170 countries. Kraft’s products are divided into five categories: snacks and cereals, beverages, cheese and dairy, grocery, and convenient meals. Popular household name brands...
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