Internal Operation Management

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Best Practices

Dell - Dell Chemicals Management Program

Dell, one of the major computer makers in the world, has responded proactively and systematically to both increasing global legislative on the use and management of hazardous substances and increasing consumer awareness. Dell's Chemicals Management Program not only complies with upcoming as well as existing legal requirements but also meets key stakeholders requirements, which often turn out to be tougher than the legal standards. Dell's 'Chemicals Use Policy', last updated in December 2005, clearly re-enforces its precautionary measures to eliminate substances of concern, by (1) maintaining a 'Restricted Substance Program' which includes more than 50 substances and compounds, (2) tight management from the outset of the product design process to the supply chain, and (3) actively seeking viable alternative substances. The Chemical Use Policy also demonstrates Dell's commitment to eliminating all remaining uses of brominated flame-retardants (BFRs) by 2015. As for polyvinyl chloride (PVC), the material is already on the Restricted Use List and a phase-out plan will be annually reviewed until it is completed.

Samsung Electronics - Identification & Management of Target Substances

Samsung Electronics has a firmly established, so-called "product environment" strategy, under which its policy on target substances is carefully managed. Its policy on the use and phase out of target substances is well detailed in a list called 'Identification and Management of Target Substances' and the Samsung Electronics Standard for the Control of Substances with Environmental Impacts within Products (SEC Standard 0QA-2049, latest updated in September 2006). The list identifies substances, categorized as Class III, that are not yet restricted by law but whose use in Samsung's products is monitored and reported by suppliers in order to develop appropriate measures for future restrictions and phase out programmes. PVC and brominated flame-retardants (BFRs) are representative examples as Class III substances. The company has set targets to completely phase out PVC in all applications from January 2011. Although the company has made some progress, Samsung is still identifying the most suitable alternatives for each application and plans to eliminate use of BFRs as of January 2010. Meanwhile, the company has not yet announced plans on phthalates and chlorinated flame-retardants.

SC Johnson and Son, Inc - GreenlistTM: Using Responsible Materials

SC Johnson's GreenlistTMprocess is a good example of how a company whose products are based on chemicals ingredients can systematically address their impact on human health and the environment and how to manage the risk profile accordingly. The GreenlistTM was developed in 2001 to formalize the classification of raw materials used in the company's products based on the impact they have on the environment and human health with a rating from 3 to 0 - 3 being "Best", 2 "Better", 1 "Acceptable" and 0 "Restricted". It provides ratings for more than 95 percent of the raw materials the company uses. The company believes that the GreenlistTMprocess enables it to track the environmental profile of their raw materials used with the scores provided and set new goals. Equally important, SC Johnson has been able to use insights from the GreenlistTM process to identify and promote ingredients that are more environmentally sustainable in its supply chain. This allows consideration of more sustainable resources, including renewable materials, and helps identify suppliers that demonstrate a higher level of environmental responsibility.

Sony - Management Regulations for Environment-Related Substances in Parts and Materials

The global nature of Sony's markets and its extensive supply chains and instances of sales loss in recent years have urged the company to enhance its management systems to facilitate the control, reduction or...
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